US, EU, Japan label China's trade policies as 'unfair'

EU companies also urged to reduce reliance on Chinese market by German industry association

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Chinese Premier Li Keqiang (right) with European Council President Donald Tusk at last year's EU-China summit.

Chinese Premier Li Keqiang (right) with European Council President Donald Tusk at last year's EU-China summit. (By Associated Press)

TAIPEI (Taiwan News) — A number of countries have come together to express concerns over unfair trade practices and policies in China.

On Jan. 9, U.S. trade representatives convened a meeting alongside European Union and Japanese trade ministers in which they discussed concerns over Chinese behavior in the international trade and manufacturing fields, including industrial subsidies and forced technology transfer, according to The Japan News.

During the meeting, delegates agreed to seek negotiations on setting international e-commerce rules at the World Trade Organization (WTO), for which talks are expected to be announced later this month, the report states.

Liberty Times says Japan, the E.U. and U.S. trade representatives issued a joint statement, declaring China’s current trade policies “non-market-oriented” and unfair. Delegates said the practices result in WTO rules being ineffective, serious production overcapacity, and unfair competition in the three trade regions.

In addition to this, leading German industrial association BDI is appealing for European companies to reduce dependency on the Chinese market over price dumping and technology transfer concerns, Reuters reports.

While the BDI admitted German companies rely on China to some extent, the report states, Beijing has expressed no will to further open up its domestic market, and so the association is urging the E.U. to create “a stronger economic framework” to “bind firms from non-market economies to its own liberal economic system.”