Taiwan's local governments advocate banning using kitchen scraps as pig feed

Yunlin County Government is more ironhanded by acting early to totally ban the practice of using kitchen leftovers as pig feed, reports said

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(Photo courtesy of Kaohsiung City Government)

(Photo courtesy of Kaohsiung City Government) (By Central News Agency)

TAIPEI (Taiwan News) – Some of Taiwan’s local governments seem to be more zealous than the central government about encouraging pig farmers not to use kitchen scraps to feed their pigs amidst the African swine fever scare, according to a Chinese-language Economic Daily News report on Monday.

Council of Agriculture’s (COA) earlier announced that only when a disease outbreak happens in Taiwan, will the agency move to totally ban the practice of feeding pigs with kitchen scraps. The agency also said pig farms uncertified for using leftovers as pig feed must pass inspection in a week, or change to using fodder or face closure.

Compared to the COA’s moderate stance, Yunlin County Government is more ironhanded by acting early to totally ban the practice of using kitchen leftovers as pig feed in the county at the end of last year, Economic Daily News reported.

The report also said Kaohsiung City Animal Protection Office had given 35 pig farms not on the government’s radar a week’s notice to change from using leftovers as feed to using fodder or face closure.

On the other hand, Chiayi County adopted a “carrot and stick” approach by offering more incentives to encourage pig farmers to switch to fodder.

Chiayi County Magistrate Weng Chang-liang Chinese(翁章梁) said that a subsidy of NT$2,500 per pig was offered, and for those who want to stick to using heated leftovers, a subsidy of NT$10,000, NT$100,000, or NT$300,000 is offered depending on the standards set forth by the county to encourage them to upgrade their leftovers heating equipment.

However, frequent inspections on their heating equipment will be conducted, and if they fail to pass the inspections, they will be fined immediately, he added.

(Photo courtesy of Pingtung County Government)

(Photo by CNA)