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Journalist group says year's 94 killings end recent decline

FILE - In this file photo dated Thursday, May 31, 2018, a man carries a portrait of slain journalist Hector Gonzalez Antonio as his daughter, left, mo...
FILE - In this file photo dated Thursday, July 5, 2018, people pause for a moment of silence next to a memorial near the Capital Gazette building, in ...
FILE - In this Jan. 29, 2011 file photo, Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi speaks on his cellphone at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. K...

FILE - In this file photo dated Thursday, May 31, 2018, a man carries a portrait of slain journalist Hector Gonzalez Antonio as his daughter, left, mo...

FILE - In this file photo dated Thursday, July 5, 2018, people pause for a moment of silence next to a memorial near the Capital Gazette building, in ...

FILE - In this Jan. 29, 2011 file photo, Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi speaks on his cellphone at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. K...

BRUSSELS (AP) — An international trade association says killings of journalists and news media staff rose again in 2018 following an overall decline during the past half- dozen years.

The International Federation of Journalists said in an annual report set for release on Monday that the number of media industry workers slain around the world rose to 94, 12 more than in 2017.

Before the now-ended downward trend, the news industry saw 121 staff killings in 2012 and as many as 155 in 2006.

The deadliest country for people who work in the news media this year was Afghanistan, where 16 of the killings occurred. Mexico was next, with 11. Yemen had nine media slayings and Syria eight in 2018.


Updated : 2021-03-01 00:40 GMT+08:00