Carbon conscious: how one man is shrinking his footprint

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In this Dec. 7, 2018 photo Dirk Gratzel walks with his dog at his hunting ground in Stollberg, western Germany. Gratzel counts his carbon emissions. T...
In this Dec. 7, 2018 photo Dirk Gratzel speaks during an interview with the Associated Press in Stollberg, western Germany. Gratzel counts his carbon ...
In this Dec. 7, 2018 photo Dirk Gratzel walks with his dog at his hunting ground in Stollberg, western Germany. Gratzel counts his carbon emissions. T...
In this Dec. 7, 2018 photo Dirk Gratzel, left, and neighbor kid Elias feed their chicken in Stollberg, western Germany. Gratzel counts his carbon emis...
In this Dec. 7, 2018 photo Dirk Gratzel poses for a photo with his dog at his hunting ground in Stollberg, Germany. Gratzel counts his carbon emission...

In this Dec. 7, 2018 photo Dirk Gratzel walks with his dog at his hunting ground in Stollberg, western Germany. Gratzel counts his carbon emissions. T...

In this Dec. 7, 2018 photo Dirk Gratzel speaks during an interview with the Associated Press in Stollberg, western Germany. Gratzel counts his carbon ...

In this Dec. 7, 2018 photo Dirk Gratzel walks with his dog at his hunting ground in Stollberg, western Germany. Gratzel counts his carbon emissions. T...

In this Dec. 7, 2018 photo Dirk Gratzel, left, and neighbor kid Elias feed their chicken in Stollberg, western Germany. Gratzel counts his carbon emis...

In this Dec. 7, 2018 photo Dirk Gratzel poses for a photo with his dog at his hunting ground in Stollberg, Germany. Gratzel counts his carbon emission...

STOLLBERG, Germany (AP) — Dirk Gratzel is part of a small but growing group of people looking for ways to cut their own greenhouse gas emissions

As ministers gather Tuesday in Poland for the final stretch of U.N. climate talks, the German software entrepreneur is doing what he can to curb his carbon footprint.

Gratzel turned to scientists two years ago to help him put a precise figure on his personal emissions and found he was way over budget compared with what experts say is sustainable.

The 50-year-old say he has managed to cut his emissions of greenhouse gases by almost three-quarters by not flying anymore, eating less meat and dairy, and cycling to work.

Gratzel is still trying to figure out how to undo the more than 1,000 tons of emissions he's already accumulated in his lifetime.