Taiwan seeks Japan's support for joining CPTPP: President Tsai

President Tsai said Taiwan’s participation in the trade pact will be to Japan’s strategic advantage

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President Tsai Ing-wen meets with Takao Fujii, the chair of Japan’s nationwide goodwill ambassador associations, on Dec. 5 (Source: the Presidential O

President Tsai Ing-wen meets with Takao Fujii, the chair of Japan’s nationwide goodwill ambassador associations, on Dec. 5 (Source: the Presidential O

TAIPEI (Taiwan News) — While meeting with Takao Fujii, a senior Japanese politician who currently chairs the national federation of Japan-Taiwan Friendship Associations, on Wednesday, President Tsai Ing-wen (蔡英文) said the government hopes to gain Japan’s support to join the CPTPP, a regional trade agreement that was singed by 11 nations in March.

Bilateral trade between Taiwan and Japan is valued at US$62.8 billion, remarked President Tsai, reasoning that Taiwan’s participation in the trade pact will be to Japan’s strategic advantage.

Taiwan has repeatedly expressed an interest in taking part in the second-round negotiations of the CPTPP, now led by Japan after the United States withdrew from the CPTPP’s precursor agreement known as the TPP in 2017. The new agreement has been ratified by a number of member states, including Japan and Singapore, since March.

Recognizing Fujii’s decades of experience in Japan’s politics, the president urged him to continue to support Taiwan as the country seeks support from within the Japanese government for participation in the CPTPP.

This is Fujii’s 27th visit to Taiwan. During his terms as the secretary general of the Japan-ROC Diet Members’ Consultative Council, Fujii facilitated substantive exchanges between Taiwan and Japan, according to a press released issued by the Presidential Office on Wednesday after the meeting.

The president also expressed hopes that Fujii will help to promote cooperation between the two nations in developing potential regional markets, considering his long-term involvement in international affairs.