Taiwanese graffiti artist Candy Bird opens exhibition featuring homicide cases

'20,000 Ways to Die in Yau Ma Tei' discusses violence from various perspectives

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Candy Bird launched solo exhibition featuring murder incidents at Xingzhe Art Salon (image by Taiwan News)

Candy Bird launched solo exhibition featuring murder incidents at Xingzhe Art Salon (image by Taiwan News)

TAIPEI (Taiwan News) -- Taiwanese graffiti artist Candy Bird has launched his latest solo exhibition titled "20,000 Ways to Die in Yau Ma Tei" (油麻地的兩萬種死法), featuring 10 murder cases in Hong Kong.

The exhibition is taking place in Xingzhe Art Salon in Taipei's Da'an district, and will be open until Nov. 30.


The map of 20,000 ways to die in Yau Ma Tei. (Taiwan News Image)

Taiwanese modern artist Candy Bird is well-known for his creative graffiti works and their dark sense of humor. His latest series of works were inspired by 10 murder cases that happened in the Yau Ma Tei district of Hong Kong.

In 2016, Candy Bird visited Yau Ma Tei and had a guided tour of the locations where those homicide cases took place. The cases inspired him to think about the hidden violence in the city.

"The majority of the victims were female. Among all the incidents, one that impressed me the most was a model whose body got discovered 4 years after her death," said Candy Bird.

According to the artist, Even now, the cause of her death still has yet to be determined. She must have beeen very lonely while alive. I would like to know what happened to the society.


The theme "media violence" uses images of Taiwanese killer Zheng Joe (Taiwan News Image)

Since his visit to Hong Kong, he began to notice that there were similar cases happening in Taiwan. Based on his personal experiences, he created a series of drawings that reveal different forms of violence.

"20,000 Ways to Die in Yau Ma Tei" discovers and discusses violence from various perspectives, which includes topics like domestic abuse, media, the death penalty, and more. The exhibition is aimed at raising people's awareness of urban violence. After the exhibition in Taipei ends on Nov. 30, it will then be showcased in Hong Kong.


The venue was designed as a crime scene (Taiwan News Image)