Turbulent stock markets spooking older workers, retirees

Attorney Mark Patterson poses in his law firm's offices Thursday, Nov. 15, 2018, in Nashville, Tenn. The recent turbulence in the U.S. stock markets i

Attorney Mark Patterson poses in his law firm's offices Thursday, Nov. 15, 2018, in Nashville, Tenn. The recent turbulence in the U.S. stock markets i

Attorney Mark Patterson poses in his law firm's offices Thursday, Nov. 15, 2018, in Nashville, Tenn. The recent turbulence in the U.S. stock markets i

Attorney Mark Patterson poses in his law firm's offices Thursday, Nov. 15, 2018, in Nashville, Tenn. The recent turbulence in the U.S. stock markets i

CHICAGO (AP) — The recent turbulence in the U.S. stock markets is spooking some older workers and retirees, a group that was hit particularly hard during the most recent financial crisis.

There's no indication, though, that the recent volatility has brought about large-scale overhauls in retirement planning.

A vice president at Allianz Life Insurance Co., Paul Kelash, says the market fluctuations are like a return to normalcy after what had been a steady upturn. He says he hasn't seen much evidence of Americans drastically altering their retirement plans

A Bankrate survey says 62 percent of Americans — and 76 percent of those 65 and over — don't believe their financial situation has improved in the two years since Donald Trump's election. Nearly 1 in 5 say their finances have actually gotten worse.