Migrants' brief hopes of buses to Mexico's capital dashed

Central American migrants, part of the caravan hoping to reach the U.S. border, get a ride on trucks, in Donaji, Oaxaca state, Mexico, Friday, Nov. 2,

Central American migrants, part of the caravan hoping to reach the U.S. border, get a ride on trucks, in Donaji, Oaxaca state, Mexico, Friday, Nov. 2,

Salvadoran migrants cross the Suchiate river, the border between Guatemala and Mexico, on Friday, Nov. 2, 2018. A new group of Central American migran

Salvadoran migrants cross the Suchiate river, the border between Guatemala and Mexico, on Friday, Nov. 2, 2018. A new group of Central American migran

Central American migrants, part of the caravan hoping to reach the U.S. border, get a ride on a truck, in Donaji, Oaxaca state, Mexico, Friday, Nov. 2

Central American migrants, part of the caravan hoping to reach the U.S. border, get a ride on a truck, in Donaji, Oaxaca state, Mexico, Friday, Nov. 2

Honduran migrant Luz Padilla Valverde, carrying her child, begs for contributions of one peso (5 cents) from passing drivers, as a thousands-strong ca

Honduran migrant Luz Padilla Valverde, carrying her child, begs for contributions of one peso (5 cents) from passing drivers, as a thousands-strong ca

Central American migrants, part of the caravan hoping to reach the U.S. border, get a ride on a truck, in Donaji, Oaxaca state, Mexico, Friday, Nov. 2

Central American migrants, part of the caravan hoping to reach the U.S. border, get a ride on a truck, in Donaji, Oaxaca state, Mexico, Friday, Nov. 2

Central American migrants, part of the caravan hoping to reach the U.S. border, get a ride on a truck, in Donaji, Oaxaca state, Mexico, Friday, Nov. 2

Central American migrants, part of the caravan hoping to reach the U.S. border, get a ride on a truck, in Donaji, Oaxaca state, Mexico, Friday, Nov. 2

Migrants light a fire for cooking as a thousands-strong caravan of Central Americans hoping to reach the U.S. border stops for the night, in Matias Ro

Migrants light a fire for cooking as a thousands-strong caravan of Central Americans hoping to reach the U.S. border stops for the night, in Matias Ro

Mexicans in a car stop to talk to Honduran migrant Luz  Padilla Valverde, carrying her child, as she begs for contributions of one peso (5 cents), in

Mexicans in a car stop to talk to Honduran migrant Luz Padilla Valverde, carrying her child, as she begs for contributions of one peso (5 cents), in

Honduran migrant Luz  Padilla Valverde, carrying her child, gets a contribution from a passing driver in Matias Romero, Oaxaca state, Mexico, Thursday

Honduran migrant Luz Padilla Valverde, carrying her child, gets a contribution from a passing driver in Matias Romero, Oaxaca state, Mexico, Thursday

Migrants wait in lines to use portable toilets at a makeshift campground where a thousands-strong caravan of Central Americans hoping to reach the U.S

Migrants wait in lines to use portable toilets at a makeshift campground where a thousands-strong caravan of Central Americans hoping to reach the U.S

Migrants sleep inside a hotel that was abandoned after being damaged in last year's earthquake, in Matias Romero, Oaxaca state, Mexico, Thursday, Nov.

Migrants sleep inside a hotel that was abandoned after being damaged in last year's earthquake, in Matias Romero, Oaxaca state, Mexico, Thursday, Nov.

A migrant sleeps inside a hotel that was abandoned after being damaged in last year's earthquake, in Matias Romero, Oaxaca state, Mexico, Thursday, No

A migrant sleeps inside a hotel that was abandoned after being damaged in last year's earthquake, in Matias Romero, Oaxaca state, Mexico, Thursday, No

SAYULA, Mexico (AP) — Thousands of Central American migrants traveling in a caravan through southern Mexico had their brief hopes of reaching the country's capital on Saturday dashed after the governor of Veracruz state pulled an offer of dozens of buses to take them there.

Gov. Miguel Angel Yunes announced Friday evening that authorities in Veracruz would be providing not only humanitarian assistance to the migrants but buses to leapfrog them to Mexico City after three grueling weeks spent walking along highways and hitching rides to reach the coastal state.

But almost immediately afterward, Yunes released a second video saying that because Mexico City's water system was undergoing maintenance, it would not be correct to send the migrants there.