Stacey Abrams' trying to mobilize Georgia's sporadic voters

FILE- In this May 22, 2018, file photo Georgia's Democratic gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams waves in Atlanta. Abrams is trying to reach voters w

FILE- In this May 22, 2018, file photo Georgia's Democratic gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams waves in Atlanta. Abrams is trying to reach voters w

In this Monday Oct. 8, 2018, photo, Leila Hart, 21, explains early voting and absentee voting to a resident in Forest Park, Ga. Hart is a paid canvass

In this Monday Oct. 8, 2018, photo, Leila Hart, 21, explains early voting and absentee voting to a resident in Forest Park, Ga. Hart is a paid canvass

FILE - In this July 26, 2018, file photo, Georgia Secretary of State Brian Kemp appears during a unity rally, in Peachtree Corners, Ga.  Georgia's Dem

FILE - In this July 26, 2018, file photo, Georgia Secretary of State Brian Kemp appears during a unity rally, in Peachtree Corners, Ga. Georgia's Dem

FOREST PARK, Ga. (AP) — Democrat Stacey Abrams says she cannot become governor of Georgia without convincing tens of thousands of sporadic voters to come to the polls.

So her campaign is spending considerable sums on paid canvassers, field offices for volunteers and direct mail pieces aimed at more than 1.5 million Georgians who don't usually vote in midterm elections.

It's a contrast to Republican Brian Kemp. The current secretary of state has a well-funded and aggressive campaign, but will depend more on the traditional Republican electorate in Georgia.

Abrams is trying to become the first black female governor in U.S. history.

Early returns from mail-in ballots suggest she's having at least some success in coaxing ballots from black voters and young voters who didn't vote in the 2014 midterms.