US, Russian astronauts reach Russia after emergency landing

In this photo released by Roscosmos, NASA Astronaut Nick Hague, left, and Roscosmos cosmonaut Alexei Ovchinin pose for a photo in Baikonur, Kazakhstan

In this photo released by Roscosmos, NASA Astronaut Nick Hague, left, and Roscosmos cosmonaut Alexei Ovchinin pose for a photo in Baikonur, Kazakhstan

In this photo provided by Roscosmos, U.S. astronaut Nick Hague, right, embraces his wife Catie in Baikonur airport, Kazakhstan, Thursday, Oct. 11, 201

In this photo provided by Roscosmos, U.S. astronaut Nick Hague, right, embraces his wife Catie in Baikonur airport, Kazakhstan, Thursday, Oct. 11, 201

In this photo provided by Roscosmos, Russian cosmonaut Alexey Ovchinin, center, and U.S. astronaut Nick Hague, second from right, meet with their fami

In this photo provided by Roscosmos, Russian cosmonaut Alexey Ovchinin, center, and U.S. astronaut Nick Hague, second from right, meet with their fami

In this photo provided by Russian Defense Ministry Press Service, the Soyuz MS-10 space capsule lays in a field after an emergency landing near Dzhezk

In this photo provided by Russian Defense Ministry Press Service, the Soyuz MS-10 space capsule lays in a field after an emergency landing near Dzhezk

MOSCOW (AP) — A U.S. astronaut and a Russian cosmonaut have arrived in the Moscow region following a failed launch to the International Space Station that forced an emergency landing.

NASA's Nick Hague and Roscosmos' Alexei Ovchinin blasted off to the orbiting lab on Thursday but had to use an escape capsule less than two minutes into the flight after their Soyuz rocket suffered an unspecified failure of its second stage.

Roscosmos director general Dmitry Rogozin, who traveled to Kazakhstan to bring the crew back, posted a picture of himself and the two men Friday, saying they are safely back in the Moscow region.

Thursday's incident was Russia or the Soviet Union's first manned launch failure since September 1983, when a Soyuz exploded on the launch pad.