Remains of US submarine innovator exhumed in Panama

Maritime archaeologist James Delgado inspects debris on the grave site of Julius H. Kroehl before exhuming his body from Amador Cemetery in the Chorri

Maritime archaeologist James Delgado inspects debris on the grave site of Julius H. Kroehl before exhuming his body from Amador Cemetery in the Chorri

Maritime archaeologist James Delgado sweeps away debris on the gravesite of Julius H. Kroehl before exhuming his body from Amador Cemetery in the Chor

Maritime archaeologist James Delgado sweeps away debris on the gravesite of Julius H. Kroehl before exhuming his body from Amador Cemetery in the Chor

A man works to exhume the tomb of Julius H. Kroehl from Amador Cemetery in the Chorrillo neighborhood of Panama City, Thursday, Oct. 11, 2018. The rem

A man works to exhume the tomb of Julius H. Kroehl from Amador Cemetery in the Chorrillo neighborhood of Panama City, Thursday, Oct. 11, 2018. The rem

Maritime archaeologist James Delgado, left, cleans a piece of the skull bone of Julius H. Kroehl as his body is exhumed from Amador Cemetery in the Ch

Maritime archaeologist James Delgado, left, cleans a piece of the skull bone of Julius H. Kroehl as his body is exhumed from Amador Cemetery in the Ch

People gather under a tent as they exhume the body of Julius H. Kroehl from Amador Cemetery in the Chorrillo neighborhood of Panama City, Thursday, Oc

People gather under a tent as they exhume the body of Julius H. Kroehl from Amador Cemetery in the Chorrillo neighborhood of Panama City, Thursday, Oc

In this March 12, 2004 photo provided by the U.S. embassy in Panama, a diver stands by the submarine designed by Julius H. Kroehl, wrecked off San Tel

In this March 12, 2004 photo provided by the U.S. embassy in Panama, a diver stands by the submarine designed by Julius H. Kroehl, wrecked off San Tel

In this March 12, 2004 photo provided by the U.S. embassy in Panama, the submarine designed by Julius H. Kroehl emerges from the water during low tide

In this March 12, 2004 photo provided by the U.S. embassy in Panama, the submarine designed by Julius H. Kroehl emerges from the water during low tide

PANAMA CITY (AP) — The remains of a German-American who invented the first submarine able to dive and resurface by itself have been exhumed in Panama.

Julius Kroehl's remains were dug up from a cemetery Thursday with help from the U.S. Embassy. They are to be reburied alongside U.S. war veterans near the Panama Canal.

The embassy says authorities will also seek to confirm the identity of the remains and establish a cause of death.

Kroehl built his submarine from parts brought from New York to search for pearls off Panama's Pacific coast during the 19th century. Records say he died at age 47 of malaria, but some suspect he was killed by decompression sickness — also known as the bends.

Kroehl was buried in 1867, and his grave was only rediscovered in 2005.