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South Pacific magnitude 5.0 undersea quake unlikely to have triggered tsunami

South Pacific magnitude 5.0 undersea quake unlikely to have triggered tsunami

An undersea earthquake of magnitude 5.0 rumbled deep in the South Pacific ocean late Tuesday, but there was little prospect it triggered a tsunami, a New Zealand seismologist said Wednesday.
The quake, 300 kilometers (188 miles) deep and some 700 kilometers (438 miles) north of the northern New Zealand city of Auckland, occurred in the south of an area known as the New Hebrides Trench at 9:06 p.m. Tuesday New Zealand time (0806 GMT Tuesday), said seismologist Ken Gledhill of the geological science group, GNS Science.
The quake was located some 270 miles (434 kilometers) west of Macauley Island, one of the uninhabited Kermadec Islands group northeast of New Zealand that sit along the Pacific "Ring of Fire" where quakes and volcanic eruptions are not uncommon.
Prospects of a tsunami occurring from the quake "are remote, and the more remote the deeper" it occurred, Gledhill told The Associated Press.
Its position and depth meant the tremblor was unlikely to have been felt in New Zealand, he added.
New Zealand sits above an area of the earth's crust where the Pacific and Australian tectonic plates are colliding and records more than 14,000 earthquakes a year _ but only about 150 are felt by residents. Fewer than 10 a year do any damage.


Updated : 2021-03-02 13:38 GMT+08:00