Taiwanese artists invited to exhibit their works at New York Comic Con

Comic artist Chang Sheng is among several to have their work exhibited at the event this week

Chang Sheng participating in New York Comic Con for the first time

Chang Sheng participating in New York Comic Con for the first time

TAIPEI (Taiwan News) -- Taiwanese artists were invited to participate in the first collective exhibition of Anime Fest today, part of New York Comic Con.

Eleven industry leaders were granted booths at the city’s Javits Center to showcase Taiwan’s original comics and video games. Works exhibited include that of Taiwanese comic artist, the late-Chen Uen, and of Golden Comics Award winner Chang Sheng.

Chang Sheng, invited personally to the city to promote his work, appeared for a book signing on October 4th. The artist hopes his comics will be translated into multiple foreign languages for exposure to comic fans across the globe.

Li Chang-sheng, now 49 years old, first began drawing comics 15 years ago. He initially pursued a career in advertising before deciding to realize his dream of being a comic book artist.

Chang Sheng expressed that he had difficulty in getting his work recognized at first, and suggested the environment in Taiwan for comic book artists is presently not particularly optimistic.

After over a year of pursuing his dream, he was picked up by Tong Li Publishing, where his first comic STANLE won awards and finally set him off on the road to becoming a successful comic book artist.

New York Comic Con has been held annually since 2006, but largely favors the work of American and European artists. American comic book giants such as Marvel and DC have previously been able to expand their readership there.

Over 200,000 people are expected to participate across the four days between October 4 and October 7 this year. To accommodate an increased number of fans, a sub-exhibition area will be added, largely for Japanese anime and games.

The Taiwan booths will host almost 300 comics from nine different publishers. In addition, there are computers available so that fans can experience two new original horror-puzzle games integrating augmented reality features, and can demonstrate Taiwan’s position at the forefront of such technology.

The Taipei Cultural Center in New York hopes that these original works can help build a bridge of understanding into Taiwanese language and culture. They help form a small part of Taiwan’s diverse culture, soft power, and expressive outreach.