Dengue outbreak in Taiwan slowing down: CDC

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Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Deputy Director-General Chuang Jen-hsiang (莊人祥)

Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Deputy Director-General Chuang Jen-hsiang (莊人祥) (By Central News Agency)

The spread of dengue fever in Taiwan has started to show signs of slowing down, Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Deputy Director-General Chuang Jen-hsiang said Sunday, but he warned that it could pick again due to the recent heavy rains in some parts of the country.

Five new confirmed cases of indigenous dengue fever were reported over the past three days in Taiwan -- three in Taichung and one each in New Taipei and Kaohsiung -- bringing the total number this year to 117 as of Saturday, according to the CDC's latest statistics on the mosquito-borne disease.

Of the 117 confirmed cases so far this year, 65 were reported in Taichung, 33 in New Taipei, seven in Kaohsiung, six in Changhua, two each in Taipei and Chiayi, and one each in Taoyuan and Tainan, according to the statistics, which were released Sunday.

Chuang said five new cases over a three-day period indicated a slowdown compared with five to 10 new cases per day in early September.

However, the heavy rain in Taiwan on the periphery of Typhoon Mangkhut over the weekend might lead to an accumulation of stagnant water, which would serve as breeding grounds for the dengue mosquito, Chuang said.

He advised residents in areas of heavy rain to get rid of stagnant water in their environment to help prevent the spread of the mosquito-borne disease.

The CDC also issued a reminder to people to seek treatment as soon as possible if they develop dengue fever symptoms, which include fever, headache, severe muscle and joint pain, eye pain and skin rash.