Scientists: World's warming; expect more intense hurricanes

Russ Lewis covers his eyes from a gust of wind and a blast of sand as Hurricane Florence approaches Myrtle Beach, S.C., Friday, Sept. 14, 2018. (AP Ph

Russ Lewis covers his eyes from a gust of wind and a blast of sand as Hurricane Florence approaches Myrtle Beach, S.C., Friday, Sept. 14, 2018. (AP Ph

This satellite image provided by NOAA shows Hurricane Florence on the eastern coast of the United States on Friday, Sept. 14, 2018. (NOAA via AP)

This satellite image provided by NOAA shows Hurricane Florence on the eastern coast of the United States on Friday, Sept. 14, 2018. (NOAA via AP)

High winds and water surround buildings as Hurricane Florence hits Front Street in downtown Swansboro N.C., Friday, Sept. 14, 2018. (AP Photo/Tom Cope

High winds and water surround buildings as Hurricane Florence hits Front Street in downtown Swansboro N.C., Friday, Sept. 14, 2018. (AP Photo/Tom Cope

In this image from video, residents rescue carry cats they rescued by boat in floodwaters in Jacksonville, N.C., Friday, Sept. 14, 2018. (AP Photo/Rob

In this image from video, residents rescue carry cats they rescued by boat in floodwaters in Jacksonville, N.C., Friday, Sept. 14, 2018. (AP Photo/Rob

WASHINGTON (AP) — Study after study shows climate change in general makes hurricanes worse. But determining global warming's role in a specific storm such as Hurricane Florence is not so simple — at least not without detailed computer analysis.

The Associated Press consulted with 17 meteorologists and scientists who study climate change, hurricanes or both. A few experts remain cautious about attributing global warming to a single event, but most clearly see the hand of humans in Florence and other big storms.

Global warming didn't cause Florence, they say. But it makes the system a bigger danger.

Says Jonathan Overpeck, dean of the environment school at the University of Michigan: "Florence is yet another poster child for the human-supercharged storms that are becoming more common and destructive as the planet warms."