Almost 80% of employers in Taiwan have raised wages this year: poll

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(Image/Pixabay)

(Image/Pixabay)

Almost 80 percent of employers in Taiwan have raised wages for their employees this year, with most firms having a positive view of the current business climate and outlook, according to a survey released on Tuesday.

Citing the survey, U.S.-based human resources advisory firm ManpowerGroup said 79 percent of the 1,039 enterprises polled indicated they have raised pay for employees, with an average wage hike of 3.2 percent.

ManpowerGroup said the majority of employers in the survey wanted to use higher wages as an incentive to encourage their employees to work hard.

The survey found that 39.4 percent of employers who have paid more said the wage hike was for all employees regardless of performance, while 39.8 percent said they took employee performance into account.

In terms of different industries, 59.6 percent of firms in the local financial and real estate sectors who have raised wages said the wage hikes were for all employees, while 25.7 percent of employees in the engineering/construction industry said they will not raise salaries this year, according to the advisory firm.

ManpowerGroup Taiwan general manager Joan Yeh (葉朝蒂) said the local financial sector saw an improving bottom line last year so it is no surprise financial firms have been keen to raise salaries.

Since compensation in the local financial industry tends to be higher than in other industries, Yeh said, the average wage growth was 2.2 percent, lower than the average wage hike of 3.2 percent.

Yeh said the engineering/construction industry seems to have taken a more conservative attitude about wage hikes as the local property market remains sluggish and the government has tightened public works budgets.

In the same survey, ManpowerGroup said, 56 percent of employers agreed that employees could have part-time jobs during their spare time, but about 59 percent of employers in the financial and real estate industry said they do not allow employees to have such jobs. According to the survey, 52.2 percent of financial firms do not want employees to have part-time jobs because of possible conflicts with company business.

In sharp contrast to the financial industry, 68.6 percent of employers in the food, beverage and hospitality industry said it is ok for workers to take part-time jobs.

Yeh quoted a global survey conducted by ManpowerGroup as indicating that 87 percent of employees said they were willing to accept a "gig economy" working pattern, in which temporary positions are common, while organizations contract with independent workers for short-term engagements.

She said the latest poll in Taiwan showed a majority of enterprises are open-minded about the gig economy.