Assad property law complicates Syrians' plans to return home

FILE - In this April 12, 2016 file picture taken with a slow shutter speed, clouds hover over the capital city of Damascus, Syria. A new Syrian law em

FILE - In this April 12, 2016 file picture taken with a slow shutter speed, clouds hover over the capital city of Damascus, Syria. A new Syrian law em

FILE - In this April 15, 2018 file photo Syrians gather in the Marjeh square in Damascus, Syria. A new Syrian law empowering the government to confisc

FILE - In this April 15, 2018 file photo Syrians gather in the Marjeh square in Damascus, Syria. A new Syrian law empowering the government to confisc

FILE - In this Feb. 28, 2016 file photo a Syrian national flag waves as vehicles move slowly on a bridge during rush hour, in Damascus, Syria. A new S

FILE - In this Feb. 28, 2016 file photo a Syrian national flag waves as vehicles move slowly on a bridge during rush hour, in Damascus, Syria. A new S

FILE - In this Aug. 13, 2018 photo taken through a bus window Syrians drive their cars in front of residential buildings in Damascus, Syria. A new Syr

FILE - In this Aug. 13, 2018 photo taken through a bus window Syrians drive their cars in front of residential buildings in Damascus, Syria. A new Syr

FILE - In this Dec. 3, 2016 file photo a rainbow appears over residential buildings after a heavy rain over Aleppo, Syria. A new Syrian law empowering

FILE - In this Dec. 3, 2016 file photo a rainbow appears over residential buildings after a heavy rain over Aleppo, Syria. A new Syrian law empowering

FILE - In this Feb. 28, 2016 file photo a Syrian boy plays soccer on the roof of a building in Damascus, Syria. A new Syrian law empowering the govern

FILE - In this Feb. 28, 2016 file photo a Syrian boy plays soccer on the roof of a building in Damascus, Syria. A new Syrian law empowering the govern

BERLIN (AP) — A new Syrian law empowering the government to confiscate property is threatening to leave refugees stuck in Europe with no homes to return to.

It's led to confusion and concern among Syrian migrants and also among governments counting on many refugees to eventually go back to their homeland.

The issue is particularly sensitive for Germany, where some 800,000 Syrians have sought refuge since the start of the 2011 civil war.

Berlin has been counting on many to return home once the country is again safe and German Chancellor Angela Merkel has brought the issue up with Russian President Vladimir Putin, pressing him to use his influence with Syrian President Bashar Al-Assad to change the law.

Talks to end the war were scheduled to continue in Geneva on Monday.