Taiwan seeks to be model for Asia in stopping domestic violence: vice president

Taiwan celebrated the 20th anniversary of the enactment of the Domestic Violence Prevention Act this year, the first such legislation introduced in Asia

  203
Vice President Chen Chien-jen says on September 5 that Taiwan aims to become a model for Asian nations in stopping domestic violence

Vice President Chen Chien-jen says on September 5 that Taiwan aims to become a model for Asian nations in stopping domestic violence (By Central News Agency)

TAIPEI (Taiwan News) — Vice President Chen Chien-jen (陳建仁) said Wednesday the country aims to become a model for other nations in Asia in preventing and stopping domestic violence. 

Taiwan celebrated the 20th anniversary of the implementation of the Domestic Violence Prevention Act this year, the first such legislation introduced in Asia. 

An event about preventing and responding to domestic violence opened on Wednesday. In the following months, a series of activities aiming to raise public awareness of domestic violence and to promote the government’s policies and measures that are focused on the protection and recovery of victims of domestic violence will also kick off.

Vice President Chen remarked at the event that Taiwan is the first country in Asia to legislate against domestic violence and that multiple measures have been in place over the years to help victims of domestic violence. He hopes that with current works and future efforts carried out in Taiwan, the country will become “a model for other nations in Asia.” 

According to the statistics provided by the Ministry of Health and Welfare (MOHW), there are approximately 100,000 reported cases of domestic violence every year in Taiwan. Among them, 55 percent of the cases are related to violence between couples, 15 percent associate with adults abusing the elderly members of their immediate family, and 13 percent pertain to child and adolescent abuse. 

The vice president referred to domestic violence as a “global problem”, which violates the human rights and personal safety of those who tend to be less powerful, physically or psychologically, in society. As causes of domestic violence have been complicated by changes of family structure in recent years, we need interventions of communities and governmental institutions to be able to effectively address the problem, added the vice president. 

MOHW’s Deputy Minister Lu Pau-ching (呂寶靜) also said neighborhoods require more people who are ‘nosy’ and caring enough to detect abuse cases in the community and take action accordingly.  

According to Lu, the ministry will be seeking the help of technology, such as using big data to analyze potential risks of domestic violence, to better prevent and respond to domestic violence, and to provide information for the government or legislature for mulling policy in the future.