EU to continue to support Taiwan’s international participation

EU Head of Office in Taiwan Madeleine Majorenko reaffirms EU’s commitment to Taiwan’s international participation, encourages levelheadedness in China-Taiwan relations

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Freddie Höglund, left, Tsai Ing-wen, center, Madeleine Majorenko, right, in June 2016. (Image courtesy of EETO Taiwan Facebook)

Freddie Höglund, left, Tsai Ing-wen, center, Madeleine Majorenko, right, in June 2016. (Image courtesy of EETO Taiwan Facebook)

TAIPEI (Taiwan News) – Head of the European Union's (EU) Taiwan office, Madeleine Majorenko said that the EU will continue to support Taiwan's international participation and hopes both China and Taiwan do not take any steps to increase tension, during an interview with CNA on Aug. 25.

"Taiwan should be able to play a useful part in the international community," said Majorenko, when asked about China's recent objections to Taiwan's international participation.

The EU's representative office in Taiwan, the European Economic and Trade Office (EETO), collaborates with Taiwan on economic affairs, as well as common interests including environmental projection, climate change, research and technological development, education, and culture.

Majorenko said that the EU believes Taiwan has a role to play in the international community, and it is important for Taiwan to participate in international dialogue, reported CNA.

In this regard, it is important for Taiwan to participate in the World Health Organization and World Health Assembly, reasoning that Taiwan has the ability to contribute. Majorenko added that Taiwan's skill in science and medicine can help to combat regional infectious diseases.

When speaking about El Salvador's recent diplomatic switch to China, which the U.S. White House described as a "grave concern," Majorenko said that the EU's view is that both sides should refrain from actions that raise tension.

"No one should take any action that would make the regional situation more tense," Majorenko said, reported CNA. She added that in the regional context of the nuclear issue on the Korean peninsula and the increasingly obvious affects of climate change, cross-strait tension is the last thing we need.