Alexa

Could Brazil's Lula really run? It's not likely

FILE - In this April 7, 2018 file photo, former Brazilian President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva looks on before speaking to supporters outside the Metal...
Supporters of Brazil's former president Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva begin their Free Lula March, in Brasilia, Brazil, Tuesday, Aug. 14, 2018. Thousands ...
A supporter of Brazil's jailed, former President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva is carried in a hammock while he is on hunger strike to protest the former ...
In this photo released by the Supreme Electoral Court, from left, Worker's Party President Senator Gleisi Hoffmann, former Sao Paulo Mayor Fernando Ha...
A supporter of jailed, former President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, holds a sign that reads in Portuguese: "Free Lula" at a march in Brasilia, Brazil, ...

FILE - In this April 7, 2018 file photo, former Brazilian President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva looks on before speaking to supporters outside the Metal...

Supporters of Brazil's former president Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva begin their Free Lula March, in Brasilia, Brazil, Tuesday, Aug. 14, 2018. Thousands ...

A supporter of Brazil's jailed, former President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva is carried in a hammock while he is on hunger strike to protest the former ...

In this photo released by the Supreme Electoral Court, from left, Worker's Party President Senator Gleisi Hoffmann, former Sao Paulo Mayor Fernando Ha...

A supporter of jailed, former President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, holds a sign that reads in Portuguese: "Free Lula" at a march in Brasilia, Brazil, ...

SAO PAULO (AP) — Experts say there is a narrow path for authorities to allow jailed former President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva to run for Brazil's presidency again. But it's unlikely to be the case.

The Workers' Party defiantly registered da Silva's candidacy in October's election to much fanfare on Wednesday. That came despite his conviction for corruption and money laundering last year. The decision was upheld in January by an appeals court. Brazilian law says that candidates with a conviction upheld are ineligible to hold office for eight years.

But such candidates are not automatically barred from campaigning. The Supreme Electoral Tribunal must officially accept or reject da Silva's candidacy.

Da Silva is free to campaign and receive the benefits of being officially registered in the meantime.


Updated : 2021-02-27 15:43 GMT+08:00