Taiwan ranks in top 10 for travelers from East, SE Asia: Survey

Taiwan ranks as a top 10 travel destination for tourists from 8 Asian countries

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The Red House, Taipei. (Image courtesy of Taiwan Tourism Bureau)

The Red House, Taipei. (Image courtesy of Taiwan Tourism Bureau)

TAIPEI (Taiwan News) -- Taiwan has been ranked among the top 10 holiday destinations for travelers in eight Asian countries, according to a newly released survey by the travel website Skyscanner.

In a survey carried out in May on 5,000 Skyscanner users based in nine Asian countries/territories, Taiwan was ranked as having the second most searches by would-be travelers in Hong Kong, while it ranked third in Japan, fifth in China, sixth in South Korea, eighth in the Philippines and Malaysia, 10th in Singapore and 18th in Vietnam. 

Though Taiwan is a popular destination with Hongkongers, Japanese and South Koreans, Skyscanner asked those who had not been to Taiwan why they had not gone. Hongkongers most frequently said that it was "insufficient for sightseeing" or "not the preferred destination." 

Though many Japanese enjoy traveling to Taiwan, the U.S. ranked ahead of the country as they prefer "a tourist destination that is more distant." Many South Koreans, who come from a much higher latitude, complain about Taiwan's "hot weather."

Muslim tourists from Singapore and Malaysia said that Taiwan did not yet have a sufficient number of Halal-certified restaurants. Would-be travelers from Vietnam and the Philippines cited difficulties in applying for visas and high cost as reasons why they chose not to travel to Taiwan.  

Skyscanner Taiwan marketing manager Jane Chang (張瑜珍), said that based on Skycanner's previous survey titled "Taiwan in Asian's Minds," the country is actually a "treasured and safe island in the minds of travelers." He said that the increase in Halal restaurant certifications, easing of visa restrictions, and improved availability of information in the languages used by tourists have all improved the sightseeing environment in Taiwan.