Disappearance of 'Ink Girl' in China spurs others to deface Xi Jinping images

Journalists and human rights groups are demanding information and the release of Dong Yaoqiong

  6305
Dong Yaoqiong, the 'Ink Girl' (Images from Twitter)

Dong Yaoqiong, the 'Ink Girl' (Images from Twitter)

TAIPEI (Taiwan News) – In July 4, a Chinese women in Shanghai live streamed herself splashing ink on an image of Xi Jinping and denouncing his authoritarianism, and was detained several hours later and has not been heard from since.

After her disappearance and the deletion of her social media accounts, international human rights groups have expressed concern for her wellbeing.

Most recently the Washington based Human Rights Group Initiatives for China made a call to Chinese authorities for her unconditional release. They have also reportedly called on the U.S. government to intervene and sanction corrupt officials involved in her detention in accordance to the Global Magnitsky Act, reports Liberty Times.

The young lady who used the twitter handle @feefeefly, has since been identified as Dong Yaoqiong (董瑶琼), who was working in real estate in Shanghai, originally from Zhuzhou City in Hunan Province. Netizens have dubbed her 'Ink Girl' since the incident gained attention. 

Dong posted a photograph and a message shortly before her account disappeared showing men outside her front door along with the message:

 "There are a group of uniformed men outside my door. I will change my clothes and go out shortly. I have committed no crime. It is the organization that has harmed me that has committed the crime."


Dong's last tweet with photo enlarged.

When VOA reporters tried to contact the Shanghai Public Security Bureau about the streamer's disappearance, the office claimed they were not aware of the case and suggested the reporter fill out an interview request via fax.

After news of her disappearance spread throughout China, anger has prompted some members of the public to repeating her act of defiance, to spite the Chinese authorities, and as a show of support for Dong, whose current whereabouts are unknown.

The following is a collection of images from Twitter depicting the act of protest.


(Image from Twitter)


(Image from Twitter)


(Image from Twitter)


(Image from Twitter)


(Image from Twitter)