China considers issuing resident ID for Taiwanese working in China: former NSC chief

The former National Security Council Secretary-General Su Chi also reported that Taiwan’s remaining 19 allies are all currently engaging with Beijing

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Former National Security Council Secretary-General Su Chi (蘇起) 

Former National Security Council Secretary-General Su Chi (蘇起)  (CNA photo)

TAIPEI (Taiwan) - Former National Security Council Secretary-General Su Chi (蘇起) said that the Chinese government is talking about a plan to issue a resident identity card to Taiwanese studying and working in China.

Su broke the news on Wednesday after returning from a meeting in Beijing, China.

Now acting as the chairman of the Taipei Forum Foundation, Su recently visited Beijing to meet officials from the Taiwan Affairs Office of the State Council PRC, and think tank experts familiar with Taiwan affairs. The outspoken former NSC chief has been calling for more cross-Strait talks and less reliance on the U.S. for protection.

Su relayed messages from think tank experts in Beijing that the "1992 Consensus," a terminology which was coined by Su, and the "one China principle" are two prerequisites to restart official talks between the both sides.

"I was also told that Taiwan's remaining 19 allies are engaging with Beijing at the moment," added Su.

He continued to say in Wednesday's forum that the Chinese government is mulling over a plan to issue a resident identity card to certain Taiwanese who are studying and working in China but who would be subject to limitations or penalties if they return to the island country.

Beijing has been blaming the Tsai Ing-wen administration for the deterioration of cross-Strait ties, while China wages a campaign to exclude Taiwan from the world stage; a campaign that has included blocking the island country from joining international meetings of WHA, and ordering international airlines to list Taipei as "a city of China" rather than as the capital of Taiwan.