Film reveals bond of kindness between Vietnamese family and Taiwanese people

A Vietnamese pupil was helped by Taiwan’s businessmen and medical experts, and in return, she starred in a film that urges Taiwan's participation in the WHA

"A Perfect Pair" film director Hung Chu-yen and producer Hsu Ju-an spoke with the media on Thursday about their production experience at MOFA

"A Perfect Pair" film director Hung Chu-yen and producer Hsu Ju-an spoke with the media on Thursday about their production experience at MOFA (Taiwan News photo)

TAIPEI (Taiwan News) — After the Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MOFA) released a short film calling for Taiwan’s participation in the World Health Assembly (WHA), a story depicting the bond between a Vietnamese family and Taiwanese people was thus revealed, gaining over 6 million viewers worldwide.

In an attempt to show Taiwan has the ability and willingness to make contributions to global health issues, MOFA released a short film,"A Perfect Pair", on March 31. The film portrays a Vietnamese pupil, named Nguyen Thi Loan, recovering from a rare illness with the help of Taiwanese businessmen and medical experts.

Film director Hung Chu-yen (洪竹彥) and producer Hsu Ju-an (許儒安) spoke with the media on Thursday morning at MOFA about their production experience.

Hung said the team chose the story of Nguyen because they were inspired by the kindness of Taiwanese businessmen in Vietnam and of Taiwan’s medical experts. Most important of all, their efforts had made once paralyzed Nguyen to be able to stand and moved freely on her own, added Hung.

The still of "A Perfect Pair" (Photo courtesy of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs)

Hung said when they told Nguyen’s family about the project, they immediately agreed to cooperate and had offered much help throughout the filming period.

“The parents of Nguyen are pious Catholics. They believe that Nguyen’s recovery is a miracle, and therefore they have tried everything they could to return the favor from Taiwan,” said the director.

Hung mentioned during the week as the team was filming in Vietnam, Nguyen’s family prepared hearty meals for them every day. Even though our work sometimes delayed mealtimes, Nguyen’s family always waited us to join the table, said the director.

Henry Chen (陳銘政), director-general at MOFA’s Department of International Information Services, said the film was to convey the idea that kindness is without borders and that Taiwan has the ability to make contributions to the world’s health.

Chen said the viewership of the film just reached 608 million, and it had been shared or retweeted by U.S. Department of State's Bureau of East Asian and Pacific Affairs and the Japan-Taiwan Exchange Association.

Andrew Lee (李憲章), spokesperson for MOFA, compared the story of Nguyen to the efforts Taiwan had made in order to be involved in the WHA. “We never felt pessimistic nor slackened. And we will continue to do what we have to do,” said Lee.

Before Taiwan was excluded from the WHA in 2017, the country had participated in the annual meeting for eight years as an observer.

Michael Hsu (徐佩勇), director-general at MOFA’s Department of International Organizations, said on April 24 that the situation this year remained difficult.

The registration deadline for attending the assembly scheduled from May 21 to 26 in Geneva, Switzerland is May 7. Taiwan has not yet received an invitation from the World Health Organization, which has reportedly felt great pressure from China.