Alexa
  • Directory of Taiwan

Mexican government announces 6-point plan against corruption

Mexican government announces 6-point plan against corruption

President Felipe Calderon's top anti-corruption official on Saturday announced a six-point plan to tackle the bribes, kickbacks and theft from government coffers that plague Mexico.
Secretary German Martinez, of the Public Administration Department, said the plan will include anti-corruption education programs, better disclosure of government activities and a uniform system to revise spending in all government departments.
Martinez said he signed a measure banning government officials from receiving official gifts worth more than US$50 (euro35) in the run up to Christmas.
"Corruption is an insult to the poorest Mexicans," Martinez said in a news conference. "It is an issue of equality and as such it is a priority issue for President Calderon."
Mexicans consider that the rot of corruption continues to be one of the nation's worst problems, despite periodical anti-corruption drives.
A global survey released this week by the Berlin-based Transparency International found 28 percent of Mexicans said somebody in their house paid a bribe within the last year, the joint worst result in Latin America along with Bolivia.
In the United States, 2 percent of respondents to the survey said somebody in their household paid a bribe.
Calderon, of the conservative National Action Party, took office earlier this month in a ceremony that was marred by street protests and fist fights by lawmakers in Congress. His opponents accuse him of conspiring with outgoing President Vicente Fox to steal the July election from leftist Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, who claims to represent the millions of poor Mexicans against the corrupt rich.
Calderon has vowed to unify the divided nation. In his first week in office, he has adopted several of his opponent's leftist proposals, cutting his salary by 10 percent and starting a program to help the 100 poorest towns and villages in the nation.


Updated : 2021-10-21 17:46 GMT+08:00