Taiwanese companies including I-Mei Foods launch anti-drugs campaign

32 corporations and groups join hands with government to offer info at stores and online

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32 Taiwanese companies and groups launch drugs prevention campaign.

32 Taiwanese companies and groups launch drugs prevention campaign. (By Taiwan News)

TAIPEI (Taiwan News) – The CEO of I-Mei Foods Co. (義美食品), Luis Ko (高志明), and movie director Wu Nien-chen (吳念真) led an alliance of 32 corporations and organizations Wednesday to launch a prevention campaign against illegal drugs.

The campaign answered a call by the Taiwan Advertising Council for its member companies to include drugs prevention as part of their operations and to cooperate with the government. The organizers presented their campaign at a news conference at the Ministry of Justice Wednesday morning.

Ko, who also chairs the Taiwan Advertising Council, drew a parallel with the era of Japanese occupation, when opium was a plague which incurred the anger of democracy activist Chiang Wei-shui (蔣渭水).

“One hundred years later, private companies need to realize how much damage drugs are causing to Taiwan society, so I invite all corporations and social groups to stand together and come out,” Ko said.

The participants in the campaign, which include I-Mei Foods, Fubon Financial and Hon Hai Precision Industry Co., Ltd., will join hands with the government and offer drugs prevention information at their outlets and branches and on their web pages.

The Ministry of Justice said the new government had introduced a new anti-drugs strategy, which would include the setting up of a drugs prevention fund in 2019.

At Wednesday’s news conference, Wu warned that both the age of users and the price of illegal drugs were falling. He described drug producers and dealers as the “worst of people,” calling for heavier punishments and for the cutting off of their supply, the Central News Agency reported.

The famous director and writer advised the government to launch more ads featuring interviews with addicts to show young people what the negative health consequences of drug use really looked like.