Taiwanese Nat. team cheated out of gold in Tug of War Championship? Netizens cry foul!

Taiwan was declared the loser in a match against Ireland, but there has been outcry over the decision by TWIF referees and judges

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(Screen capture from video by Yasu Jheng)

(Screen capture from video by Yasu Jheng)

TAIPEI (Taiwan News) – The 2018 World Championship of the Tug of War International Federation (TWIF) concluded in Xuzhou, China on March 10, with the Taiwanese national team being denied gold in the final showdown for 560 kg competition of the tournament against the Irish national team.

However, the Irish victory caused on immediate outcry for what appears to have been some poor calls, or perhaps inattention, on the part of the TWIF referee. When the winner was announced the crowd in Xuzhou erupted into demands for a rematch, and shouts decrying the bad call from the ref.

One netizen, Yasu Zheng, angered by the situation and the TWIF's refusal to address the misjudgment, made the following video to alert people to the poor judgement of the TWIF officials.

(To see the specific call in question from a wide vantage, watch the video from the 2:25 mark.)

Many observers are simply calling for a rematch, while others are demanding that the gold medal should rightfully belong to the Taiwanese team.

From the video below, it does appear that the forward leg of the foremost Irish player crosses the line, but the main referee does not make the call, instead giving the match to the Irish team.

The head of the Taiwanese team, tries to reason with the judges, and asks them to review the footage, but they refuse. They say they have to stand with the decision of the referee.

When the Taiwan coach says “Even if he is wrong?,” they reply “He wasn’t wrong.”

The video also includes footage of the coach speaking with the Irish team, and its coaches. The Irish athletes reportedly agreed that if there was a mistake or a mis-call, they would give up the medals pending a decision from the judges.

There is currently an online campaign to attempt to rectify the matches ruling. Online netizens are sending letters of complaint to the TWIF, asking them to at least own up to their mistake.