Taiwanese educators lured by China's '31 measures' must take care not to violate national security laws

Teachers employed by institutions directly administered by the Communist Party, the Chinese State or the PLA, may be subject to prosecution under Taiwanese law governing cross-strait relations

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(Image by Pixabay user Wokandapix, modified)

(Image by Pixabay user Wokandapix, modified)

TAIPEI (Taiwan News) – In response to the “31 measures” introduced by the Chinese government as a strategy to attract talent and business away from Taiwan, Taiwan’s Mainland Affairs Council (MAC) on March 12 declared that teachers who participate in any of the programs offered are still restricted in the scope of their activities, according to law in Taiwan.

At a meeting of the Education and Culture Committee of the Legislative Yuan, MAC officials emphasized that educators who choose to work in China to receive the financial benefits of Beijing’s 31 incentives, are still barred from being involved in any activities of the Chinese Communist Party, or the Chinese armed forces.

Minister of Education Pan Wen-chung (潘文忠), speaking to the committee, said that any Taiwanese educators or those working in the cultural industries discovered to be working with the Communist Party or PLA in China, will be investigated and prosecuted according to relevant national security laws.

The Minister’s comments were a stern reminder for teachers that despite the enticing offers available to them in China they will still be held to letter of the law.

If their work abroad leads them into conflict with the security concerns of the Taiwanese government, they will be held responsible, facing trial and possible punishment according to their individual circumstances, reports CNA.

According to Article 33 of the law regulating cross-strait relations (兩岸條例第33條), citizens of Taiwan may not serve as members or employees of institutions administered by the CCP, the Chinese government, or any Chinese military organizations. Article 90 outlines the corresponding penalties that are to be imposed if a citizen is found to violate the law.

The Ministry and the MAC strongly advise that educators familiarize themselves with the law before applying for any work positions, or funding from Chinese universities or research programs, to be certain they will not be in violation of Taiwan’s laws.

The MAC and other agencies are closely observing China’s program of 31 benefits and incentives for Taiwanese citizens, in its development and implementation, to carefully monitor the possible impact on Taiwan’s industries or society.