Olympians balance parenthood with chasing career goals

In this 2016 photo provided by Wayde Carroll, U.S. cross-country skier Kikkan Randall trains while pregnant in Anchorage, Alaska. Randall is the only

In this 2016 photo provided by Wayde Carroll, U.S. cross-country skier Kikkan Randall trains while pregnant in Anchorage, Alaska. Randall is the only

In this 2017 photo provided by U.S. cross-country skier Kikkan Randall, Randall poses with her son Breck in Gallivare, Sweden. Only a fraction of the

In this 2017 photo provided by U.S. cross-country skier Kikkan Randall, Randall poses with her son Breck in Gallivare, Sweden. Only a fraction of the

In this 2016 photo provided by Wayde Carroll, U.S. cross-country skier Kikkan Randall trains while pregnant in Anchorage, Alaska. Randall is the only

In this 2016 photo provided by Wayde Carroll, U.S. cross-country skier Kikkan Randall trains while pregnant in Anchorage, Alaska. Randall is the only

PYEONGCHANG, South Korea (AP) — Only a fraction of the hundreds of athletes competing in the Winter Games are also parents.

Many ambitious professionals carefully schedule when to have children. Olympians face even more challenges, trying to schedule around competition, work, travel, childcare and keeping in top shape.

U.S. cross-country skier Kikkan Randall had a child after the Sochi Games and is back in Pyeongchang for her fifth and final Olympics. She says she was ready to start a family, but not quite ready to retire. Randall has been able to continue competing with the help of her husband and their parents.

She says the International Olympic Committee has an opportunity to do more to support Olympic athletes who have children.

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