Taiwan to see balmy Lunar New Year holiday 

More sunshine expected throughout the Lunar New Year holiday in Taiwan until next Tuesday

People can see a swath of cherry blossoms in Taoyuan during the holiday. Arrange a trip and enjoy sunshine. (By Central News Agency)

TAIPEI (Taiwan News) - The first day of the Lunar New Year in 2018 falls on Friday, February 16. After a cold start to the week, Taiwan’s Central Weather Bureau (CWB) predicts a lot of sunshine and warmer temperatures between the Lunar New Year's Eve and next Monday, the fourth day of the Lunar New Year.

The warm weather will continue until another cold surge moves southward to send the mercury back down again next Tuesday, the last day of the holiday.

A strong cold air mass has gripped much of the country since last Sunday, but it began to weaken late Tuesday, with the temperature forecast to climb higher on Wednesday to between 22 and 25 degrees in the daytime across the northern and eastern parts of the country. 

The CWB said in a media briefing Tuesday that warm weather is forecast for the first four days of the Lunar New Year, followed by another cold air mass set to arrive on the fifth day of the Lunar New Year with a higher chance of precipitation in the northern and eastern part of Taiwan. The bureau reminded people of large temperature fluctuations between day and night throughout the holiday and advised people to carry an umbrella in case of occasional showers.

According to the CWB, the highest temperatures between Thursday, Lunar New Year's Eve, and Monday will be 25 degrees Celsius in northern Taiwan, 26 and 29 degrees in central and southern Taiwan, respectively, and 25 degrees in the east of the country. 

For the weekly forecast, please click here.

Dense fog is also forecast for Taiwan’s outlying Kinmen, Matsu and Penghu islands throughout the holiday. Tourists who have scheduled a visit or people who are planning to return home on the islands by ferry should monitor ferry information before departure for possible cancellations due to a thick blanket of fog.