Malaysia slaps anti-dumping tariffs on Taiwan steel exporters

Malaysia's Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI) will impose anti-dumping tariffs effective for 5 years

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File photo, CNA Image

File photo, CNA Image

TAIPEI (CNA) -- Malaysia has imposed anti-dumping tariffs on steel exporters from Taiwan, China, South Korea and Thailand after finding that those exporters sold their products at unfairly low prices in the Malaysian market.

Malaysia's Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI) said on Thursday that will impose anti-dumping tariffs of up to 111.61 percent on cold-rolled stainless steel (CRSS) exporters from Taiwan and the other three countries, effective for five years, following an investigation into their pricing practices.

The MITI said Royal Malaysian Customs Department would enforce the collection of anti-dumping duties through Feb. 7, 2023.

Exporters from Taiwan will face anti-dumping tariffs of up to 14.02 percent, the MITI said.

Taiwan-based Tang Eng Iron Works Co. Ltd. will face a 7.78 percent anti-dumping tariff and Walsin Lihwa Corp. will face a 2.79 percent anti-dumping tariff, while Chia Far Industrial Factory Co. Ltd. and Yieh United Steel Corp. from Taiwan will not have to pay the duties. The four Taiwanese firms were the mandatory respondents in the case.

Other Taiwanese cold-rolled stainless steel exporters will have to pay the highest 14.02 percent tariff, the MITI said.

Exporters from China will face anti-dumping tariffs ranging between 2.68 percent and 23.95 percent, companies from South Korea will face duties ranging between zero and 7.27 percent, and Thai exporters will have to pay tariffs ranging from 22.86 percent to 111.61 percent.

The MITI said the investigation was launched in May 2017 after Bahru Stainless Sdn Bhd filed a petition on behalf of other Malaysian CRSS producers, accusing these foreign exporters of dumping their products in the Malaysian market.

"The petitioner alleged that imports of CRSS from the alleged countries are being dumped into Malaysia at a price much lower than their domestic prices, causing material injury to the domestic industry in Malaysia," the MITI said in a statement.

"With the imposition of anti-dumping duties on imports of CRSS from the alleged countries, it is expected that the issue of unfair trade practices will be addressed," the MITI added.

Data compiled by Taiwan's Ministry of Economic Affairs (MOEA) showed Taiwan to be the largest foreign CRSS supplier to Malaysia from 2012 to 2016, accounting for 30-40 percent of the Southeast Asian country's total imports.

Taiwan was also the largest CRSS supplier to Malaysia in the first nine months of 2017, accounting for 47 percent of the country's total imports of the product, the MOEA data showed.