Deserted Japanese-built underground reservoir in south Taiwan unveiled to the outside world

A hidden Japanese-made reservoir in Kaohsiung, southern Taiwan was unveiled to the outside world via media reports on Wednesday after being deserted for more than 70 years

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A hidden Japanese-made reservoir in Kaohsiung, southern Taiwan was unveiled to the outside world via media reports (photo by 舊城文化協會)

A hidden Japanese-made reservoir in Kaohsiung, southern Taiwan was unveiled to the outside world via media reports (photo by 舊城文化協會)

TAIPEI (Taiwan News)—A hidden Japanese-made reservoir in Kaohsiung, southern Taiwan was unveiled to the outside world via media reports on Wednesday after being deserted for more than 70 years.  

Kuo Chi-ching (郭吉清), chairman of an old city culture association (舊城文化協會提供) in Kaohsiung, said on Wednesday that the association revisited a gigantic underground water reservoir on Mount Banping (半屏山) in Kaohsiung on December 14 last year. Kuo said that the association received an approval after applying to authorities for exploring the site near the closed CPC Kaohsiung Oil Refinery where the rumored underground water reservoir existed.

Members of the association arrived at the entrance of the hidden reservoir beside the Banping Mountain Nature Park with the assistance of CPC technicians. The entrance is a 20-meter long tunnel and at the end of the entrance is an almost vertical air shaft of about 10 meters tall, according to Kuo.   

The staff members climbed the air shaft to reach the top of the reservoir, which was later found being 10 meters deep and 120 meters long and shaped like a tunnel, he said, adding that it could store as much as 6,500 tons of water.       

“So magnificent!” Kuo said, adding that the reservoir was built as a facility for wartime but had not been used for more than 70 years or had never been used due to the worsening conflict situation in World War II or technical deficiency. However, the underground reservoir is the only military ruin of its kind and a precious culture asset, he added.