The Latest: British leader to call Trump about embassy move

Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May leaves 10 Downing Street to attend the weekly session of Prime Ministers Questions in Parliament in London, Wedne

A view of Jerusalem's old city is seen Tuesday, Dec. 5, 2017. U.S. officials say President Donald Trump will recognize Jerusalem as Israel's capital o

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on President Donald Trump's decision on recognizing Jerusalem as Israel's capital (all times local):

8:55 a.m.

British Prime Minister Theresa May says she plans to call President Donald Trump to discuss his plan to relocate the American Embassy in Israel to Jerusalem.

Trump is reportedly poised to set to start the process of shifting the embassy from Tel Aviv to the holy city.

May tells the House of Commons that Britain's position is that "the status of Jerusalem should be determined in a negotiated settlement between the Israelis and the Palestinians, and Jerusalem should ultimately form a shared capital."

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8 a.m.

The Union for Reform Judaism in the United States says President Donald Trump's anticipated announcement recognizing Jerusalem as Israel's capital is "ill-timed."

The group's leader, Rabbi Rick Jacobs, says in a statement that while the reform movement believes "Jerusalem is the eternal capital of the Jewish people" and the U.S. Embassy should be moved from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem, now is not the time.

Jacobs says "we cannot support his decision to begin preparing that move now, absent a comprehensive plan for a peace process."

The New York City-based organization says the relocation should be done in the broader context reflecting Jerusalem's status as a city holy to Jews, Christians and Muslims.

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8:04 a.m.

President Donald Trump will recognize Jerusalem as Israel's capital on Wednesday despite intense Arab, Muslim and European opposition to a move that would upend decades of U.S. policy and risk potentially violent protests.

Trump will instruct the State Department to begin the multi-year process of moving the American embassy from Tel Aviv to the holy city, U.S. officials said Tuesday. It remains unclear, however, when he might take that physical step, which is required by U.S. law but has been waived on national security grounds for more than two decades.

The announcement brought warnings from leaders in the Mideast and elsewhere that this move could cause violent protests and complicate Mideast peace efforts.

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