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Kramnik draws first game against Deep Fritz

Kramnik draws first game against Deep Fritz

World chess champion Vladimir Kramnik scratched but failed to dent his computer opponent in the first game of the Man vs. Machine match, which ended in a draw after 47 moves Saturday.
Kramnik chose the quiet Catalan opening against Deep Fritz, one of the world's top few chess programs. After the game, he conceded that "it doesn't offer much advantage" but leads to the type of game that minimizes the computer's calculating prowess.
Since humans excel at long-range planning in quiet positions and computers can out-calculate humans by a factor of at least a million in complex situations, the accepted wisdom is that humans should strive for quiet positions and exchange queens early.
The queens came off on move 17, and that was about when Kramnik began to get the upper hand.
Deep Fritz's operator, Mathias Feist, shrugged that aside when asked about it later _ "sometimes you cannot avoid exchanging queens."
The queen exchange inflicted doubled pawns on Deep Fritz's kingside but also gave the computer the bishop pair.
When they reached a bishop-versus-knight endgame, it became apparent that Kramnik's knight was a better piece than Fritz's bishop.
On move 28, American grandmaster Larry Christiansen said that Kramnik had achieved the type of "no-risk situation" he was striving for. Another American grandmaster, Yasser Seirawan, thought that Kramnik had "winning chances around here."
German grandmaster Helmut Pfleger agreed that Kramnik was "always better and close to winning."
"I got certain pressure. It was rather close but never enough," Kramnik told reporters after the game. "I was never in the slightest danger. It was a logical draw."
Kramnik could not attempt to exploit the machine's weaknesses without undoubling its doubled pawns and exposing his own pawns as weaknesses. That gave Deep Fritz enough counterplay to hold on as the game simplified.
In the end, both sides had a single pawn in addition to their king and minor piece. With no winning chances, Kramnik ended the game by capturing Fritz's last remaining pawn with his knight.
Taking the knight would have left Deep Fritz with just a king and bishop, with which it is impossible to deliver checkmate.
Game two of the six-game match is scheduled for Monday. Deep Fritz will have White.
Kramnik is guaranteed a US$500,000 (euro380,000) for playing the match and will get US$1 million (euro760,000) if he wins the match.
He declined to offer any assessment of his chances after this game.
"It's too early to draw conclusions," he said.
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The game:
Kramnik-Deep Fritz
1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. g3 d5 4. Bg2 dxc4 5. Qa4+ Nbd7 6. Qxc4 a6 7. Qd3 c5 8. dxc5 Bxc5 9. Nf3 O-O 10. O-O Qe7 11. Nc3 b6 12. Ne4 Nxe4 13. Qxe4 Nf6 14. Qh4 Bb7 15. Bg5 Rfd8 16. Bxf6 Qxf6 17. Qxf6 gxf6 18. Rfd1 Kf8 19. Ne1 Bxg2 20. Kxg2 f5 21. Rxd8+ Rxd8 22. Nd3 Bd4 23. Rc1 e5 24. Rc2 Rd5 25. Nb4 Rb5 26. Nxa6 Rxb2 27. Rxb2 Bxb2 28. Nb4 Kg7 29. Nd5 Bd4 30. a4 Bc5 31. h3 f6 32. f3 Kg6 33. e4 h5 34. g4 hxg4 35. hxg4 fxe4 36. fxe4 Kg5 37. Kf3 Kg6 38. Ke2 Kg5 39. Kd3 Bg1 40. Kc4 Bf2 41. Kb5 Kxg4 42. Nxf6+ Kf3 43. Kc6 Bh4 44. Nd7 Kxe4 45. Kxb6 Bf2+ 46. Kc6 Be1 47. Nxe5 draw.


Updated : 2021-10-27 18:49 GMT+08:00