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Taiwanese employees worked 70 hours less in 2016

The annual working hours in Taiwan are shorter than those of Singapore, Mexico, South Korea, and Greece.

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The latest statistics from the Labor Ministry show Taiwanese employees worked 70 hours less in 2016 than the previous year. (Source: Pexels)

The latest statistics from the Labor Ministry show Taiwanese employees worked 70 hours less in 2016 than the previous year. (Source: Pexels)

TAIPEI (Taiwan News) – The latest statistics from Taiwan’s Labor Ministry revealed that Taiwanese employees worked 70 hours less in 2016 than the previous year, and ranked fifth for longest working hours among developed countries.

The annual working hours in Taiwan in 2016 was 2,034 in average compared to 2,104 in 2015, due to the revision of the labor law implemented in 2016 that reduced the maximum weekly working hours to 40.

Compared to data from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), Taiwan's annual working hours stood as the fifth longest in 2016, following Singapore (2,366 /hrs), Mexico (2,255 /hrs), South Korea (2,069 /hrs), and Greece (2,035 /hrs).

It should be noted that the figures include the working hours of both full-time and part-time workers.

Another way to look at the data is to see the weekly working hours. In Taiwan, employees worked 43.28 hours a week in average, which were shorter than 46.88 hours in South Korea and 44.8 hours in Japan, whose percentage of part-time workers was much higher than most other countries, which significantly brought down the country’s annual working hours.

In terms of working overtime, the data from the ministry showed industrial and service workers worked 8.5 hours more than the maximum working hours per month in 2016 and manufacturing workers’ monthly overtime hours exceeded 15.

Huang Wei-chen (黃維琛), an official at the Labor Ministry, told the Central News Agency that this statistics only compared developed countries, and that from a global perspective, the annual working hours in Taiwan would not be among the longest.

The statistics described above are extracted from the Directorate-General of Budget, Accounting and Statistics of the Executive Yuan, and OECD Statistics.