I-Mei CEO Luis Ko and director Wu Nien-jen urge Taiwanese youth ‘to say no to drugs’

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I-Mei Foods CEO Luis Ko (高志明) and movie director Wu Nien-jen (吳念真) jointly urged Taiwanese youth to say ‘no’ to drugs at a press conference on Thursda...

I-Mei Foods CEO Luis Ko (高志明) and movie director Wu Nien-jen (吳念真) jointly urged Taiwanese youth to say ‘no’ to drugs at a press conference on Thursda... (Taiwan News photo)

TAIPEI (Taiwan News)—I-Mei Foods CEO Luis Ko (高志明) and movie director Wu Nien-jen (吳念真) jointly urged Taiwanese youth to say ‘no’ to drugs at a press conference to release a series of anti-drug short films in Taipei on Thursday.

Taiwan Advertising Council (TAC), of which Ko is the chairman, commissioned Wu and his team to plan and produce the series of anti-drug films, in the hope that the main ideas in these films can be widely promulgated through the channels of government agencies, schools and large enterprises to bring down the number of people taking illegal drugs in Taiwan.

Ko said that the harm of drugs is a serious problem, especially among people of lower socioeconomic status. Very few people notice how serious the problem is because it is not an issue that can be felt by the 23 million Taiwanese people right away, like a blackout,he said, urging the public to work hard towards the goal of eradicating the drug problem for the next generations.

I-Mei CEO Luis Ko

TAC said that new narcotics have been emerging in an endless stream and the ways of their trade and circulation have been changing all the time. TCA added that the average age of people taking drugs is getting lower and lower because young people are usually more curious about the substances.

Wu said that drugs have been a serious problem in Taiwan because they are cheap and easy to package, which attract more people to try. He urged legislators in Taiwan to make a law that would not differentiate the seriousness of the crimes of making or selling different drugs according to how lethal they are. Therefore, people making or selling ketamine will be treated like people dealing cocaine, he said, adding that only by enacting such a law could children be spared the harm of drugs.

TAC said these films raise the awareness of drug problems by inviting people who were once drug addicts but are now clean to tell their stories.

Director Wu Nien-jen