North Korea threat prompts Guam natives to assert rights

In this Tuesday, Aug. 15, 2017, photo, historian of Guam's indigenous Chamorro people, Malia Tony Ramirez, 66, sits in her office in Hagatna, Guam. Th

In this Tuesday, Aug. 15, 2017, photo, historian of Guam's indigenous Chamorro people, Malia Tony Ramirez, 66, sits in her office in Hagatna, Guam. Th

In this Aug, 14, 2017 photo, a man holds Guam flag during a peace rally in Hagatna, Guam. The threatened missile attack by North Korea on Guam has pro

In this Aug, 14, 2017 photo, a man holds Guam flag during a peace rally in Hagatna, Guam. The threatened missile attack by North Korea on Guam has pro

About a hundred people gather at Chief Kepuha Park in Hagatna, Guam for a rally for peace Monday, Aug. 14, 2017.  The U.S. territory has been the subj

About a hundred people gather at Chief Kepuha Park in Hagatna, Guam for a rally for peace Monday, Aug. 14, 2017. The U.S. territory has been the subj

FILE - In this Aug. 14, 2017 file photo, Eva Aguon Cruz, 30, holds a cup with burnt flower as a ritual to call for protections from the spirits as abo

FILE - In this Aug. 14, 2017 file photo, Eva Aguon Cruz, 30, holds a cup with burnt flower as a ritual to call for protections from the spirits as abo

In this Tuesday, Aug. 15, 2017, photo, Adrian Cruz, Chairman of the Task Force for Free Association, explains some of the early history of the Chamorr

In this Tuesday, Aug. 15, 2017, photo, Adrian Cruz, Chairman of the Task Force for Free Association, explains some of the early history of the Chamorr

In this Tuesday, Aug. 15, 2017, photo, Michael Lujan Bevacqua, Assistant Professor on Chamorro Studies at University of Guam speaks about the island's

In this Tuesday, Aug. 15, 2017, photo, Michael Lujan Bevacqua, Assistant Professor on Chamorro Studies at University of Guam speaks about the island's

HAGATNA, Guam (AP) — The threatened missile attack by North Korea on Guam has prompted calls for peace from the island's indigenous people, who are weary of yet another conflict after enduring centuries of hostilities.

About one-third of the U.S. territory's 160,000 people identify as Chamorro, the indigenous group that is believed to have migrated to Guam from Indonesia and the Philippines an estimated 3,500 to 4,000 years ago. It is believed to be one of the world's first seaward migrations.

They have since endured colonization by Spanish settlers, bloody skirmishes during World War II and a steady escalation of American military presence.

Some Chamorros gathered at a peace rally this week to try to teach the world about their struggle to protect their ancestors' land, assert their rights as indigenous people and pursue some form of self-governance.