Lawsuit tossed in Taylor Swift trial, but ordeal isn't over

Attorney Douglas Baldridge, center, who represented pop singer Taylor Swift, emerges from the federal courthouse after a ruling in the civil trial for

Tree Paine, left, publicist for pop singer Taylor Swift, leads Swift's brother, Austin, right, past photographers after emerging from the federal cour

Douglas Baldridge, front center, attorney for pop singer Taylor Swift, emerges from the federal courthouse after a ruling in the civil trial for the s

Austin Swift, brother of pop singer Taylor Swift, heads to a hotel after emerging from the federal courthouse following a ruling in the civil trial fo

Shannon Melcher, former girlfriend of a Denver radio host who allegedly groped pop singer Taylor Swift, is helped to avoid the media after testifying

Tree Paine, right, publicist for pop singer Taylor Swift, walks with the singer's brother, Austin Swift, out of the federal courthouse after a ruling

Ryan Kliesch, a Denver radio host, emerges from the federal courthouse after testifying in the civil trial involving pop singer Taylor Swift, Friday,

Members of the media stand on the sidewalk as they wait for Shannon Melcher to emerge from the federal courthouse after testifying in the civil trial

Fourteen-year-old Kennedy Wares, right, and her grandmother, Nancy Eliott, both of Littleton, Colo., wait at the head of the public line for seats in

Fourteen-year-old Kennedy Wares, second from right, confers with her grandmother, Nancy Elliott, both of Littleton, Colo., as they move up the public

Ryan Kliesch, a Denver radio host, emerges from the federal courthouse after testifying in the civil trial involving pop singer Taylor Swift, Friday,

Ryan Kliesch, a Denver radio host, emerges from the federal courthouse after testifying in the civil trial involving pop singer Taylor Swift, Friday,

Ryan Kliesch, a Denver radio host, emerges from the federal courthouse after testifying in the civil trial involving pop singer Taylor Swift. Friday,

Supplied by a local radio station, boxes of donuts sit on a wall for members of the public as they wait to attend the civil trial for pop singer Taylo

Greg Dent, former security guard for pop singer Taylor Swift, emerges from the federal courthouse after testifying in the civil trial for the pop sing

Greg Dent, former security guard for pop singer Taylor Swift, emerges from the federal courthouse after testifying in the civil trial for the pop sing

Eugene Yee of Denver holds up his passes for both the morning and afternoon sessions in the civil trial for pop singer Taylor Swift, Friday, Aug. 11,

Attorneys for pop singer Taylor Swift, Douglas Baldridge, left, and Jesse P. Schaudies, Jr., are surrounded by photographers as they enter the federal

A court officer hands out passes to the public for the morning session in the civil trial for pop singer Taylor Swift, Friday, Aug. 11, 2017, in Denve

Anthony Reyther, a member of the public waiting to attend the morning session of the pop singer Taylor Swift, signs in with court officials before goi

DENVER (AP) — Taylor Swift teared up and hugged her attorneys after a judge determined a former radio host didn't prove she set out to have him fired for allegedly groping her at a photo op before a concert. But the singer's ordeal isn't over quite yet.

While the federal judge threw out David Mueller's case against Swift on Friday, identical allegations against her mother and her radio liaison are expected to go to jurors Monday.

Mueller sued the three after Swift's team reported the 2013 encounter in Denver to his bosses. He's seeking up to $3 million, saying the allegation cost him his job.

Swift countersued, saying she wanted a symbolic $1 and the chance to stand up for other women. The jury will still consider her assault claim.

Swift called the encounter with Mueller despicable and horrifying.