The Latest: Acquitted ex-Tulsa cop becomes reserve deputy

TULSA, Okla. (AP) — The Latest on a white former Tulsa police officer acquitted of manslaughter in the fatal shooting of an unarmed black man going to work for the sheriff's office in a neighboring county (all times local):

10:35 a.m.

A white former Tulsa police officer who resigned after being acquitted of manslaughter in the fatal shooting of an unarmed black man has been sworn in as a reserve deputy sheriff in a neighboring county.

Wearing a firearm on her hip and a Rogers County Sheriff's Office uniform, Betty Shelby took her oath of office Thursday morning.

Rogers County Sheriff Scott Walton has been an ardent supporter of Shelby and a critic of Tulsa County prosecutors for pursuing manslaughter charges against her.

Walton says Shelby's duties haven't been determined, but she will serve in a volunteer capacity and will not be paid.

Shelby was found not guilty in May of manslaughter in the shooting death of Terence Crutcher as he stood near his SUV on a Tulsa street.

___

6:40 a.m.

A white former Tulsa police officer who resigned after being acquitted of manslaughter in the fatal shooting of an unarmed black man is going to work for the sheriff's office in a neighboring county.

Rogers County Sheriff Scott Walton told the Tulsa World that Betty Shelby will work for his office. He did not say what her duties will be.

Shelby was found not guilty in May of manslaughter in the September shooting death of Terence Crutcher as he stood near his SUV, which was stopped in the middle of a Tulsa street.

Shelby returned to the Tulsa Police Department in an administrative position, but resigned in July, saying she felt isolated from other officers.

Walton is a former Tulsa police officer who supported Shelby as she awaited trial.