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British Museum show charts American art from 1960s to Trump


              A British Museum representative poses for photographs next to "Vote McGovern" by Andy Warhol which features in "The American Dream: pop...

              A British Museum representative poses for photographs next to "Flag I" by Jasper Johns which features in "The American Dream: pop to th...

              British Museum representatives pose for photographs in front of and behind "Standard Station" by Edward Ruscha which features in "The A...

              A British Museum representative poses for photographs next to "Standard Station" by Edward Ruscha which features in "The American Dream...

              A British Museum representative poses for photographs next to Andy Warhol's "Mao", left, and Jim Dine's "Drag: Johnson and Mao" which f...

              A British Museum representative poses for photographs next to an illuminated American flag at the entrance of "The American Dream: pop ...

              A British Museum representative poses for photographs next to "Vote McGovern" by Andy Warhol which features in "The American Dream: pop...

              A British Museum representative poses for photographs next to Robert Rauschenberg's "Signs", 1970, which features in "The American Drea...

              A British Museum representative poses for photographs next to Andy Warhol's "Marilyn 1967, 10 Color Screenprints" which feature in "The...

              A British Museum representative poses for photographs next to Roy Lichtenstein's "I Love Liberty" which features in "The American Dream...

              A British Museum representative poses for photographs next to an illuminated American flag at the entrance of "The American Dream: pop ...

              A British Museum representative poses for photographs next to "Flag I" by Jasper Johns which features in "The American Dream: pop to th...

A British Museum representative poses for photographs next to "Vote McGovern" by Andy Warhol which features in "The American Dream: pop...

A British Museum representative poses for photographs next to "Flag I" by Jasper Johns which features in "The American Dream: pop to th...

British Museum representatives pose for photographs in front of and behind "Standard Station" by Edward Ruscha which features in "The A...

A British Museum representative poses for photographs next to "Standard Station" by Edward Ruscha which features in "The American Dream...

A British Museum representative poses for photographs next to Andy Warhol's "Mao", left, and Jim Dine's "Drag: Johnson and Mao" which f...

A British Museum representative poses for photographs next to an illuminated American flag at the entrance of "The American Dream: pop ...

A British Museum representative poses for photographs next to "Vote McGovern" by Andy Warhol which features in "The American Dream: pop...

A British Museum representative poses for photographs next to Robert Rauschenberg's "Signs", 1970, which features in "The American Drea...

A British Museum representative poses for photographs next to Andy Warhol's "Marilyn 1967, 10 Color Screenprints" which feature in "The...

A British Museum representative poses for photographs next to Roy Lichtenstein's "I Love Liberty" which features in "The American Dream...

A British Museum representative poses for photographs next to an illuminated American flag at the entrance of "The American Dream: pop ...

A British Museum representative poses for photographs next to "Flag I" by Jasper Johns which features in "The American Dream: pop to th...

LONDON (AP) — The British Museum, famous for a collection that ranges from Egyptian mummies to medieval glasswork, has turned its gaze on the modern United States.

A new exhibition, "The American Dream," charts the tumultuous half-century from the 1960s to the present through artworks broadly categorized as printmaking.

The deceptively plain label embraces wildly diverse styles, from the abstract woodcuts of Donald Judd to the comic-style pop art of Roy Lichtenstein.

The show suggests that political turmoil is as American as the 4th of July.

British Museum director Hartwig Fischer says that "as a new president enters the White House and another chapter of U.S. history begins, it feels like an apposite moment to consider how artists have reflected America as a nation over 50 tumultuous years."


Updated : 2021-04-13 15:12 GMT+08:00