U.S. Senate passes bill supporting Taiwan’s Interpol participation

The bill in support of Taiwan’s participation in the International Criminal Police Organization (INTERPOL) passed the Senate by unanimous consent Tues...

TW Interpol bill passes U.S. Senate

The bill in support of Taiwan’s participation in the International Criminal Police Organization (INTERPOL) passed the Senate by unanimous consent Tues...

The bill in support of Taiwan’s participation in the International Criminal Police Organization (Interpol) passed the Senate by unanimous consent Tuesday evening, and will be handed to the White House for the President to sign and enact the bill, according to media reports.

Sponsored by U.S. Senator Cory Gardner and Ben Cardin, the bill was to direct the Department of State to develop a strategy to obtain observer status for Taiwan in the Interpol, and to urge Interpol members to support Taiwan’s observer status and participation.

In addition, the Secretary of State is required within 90 days after enactment of the bill to present to Congress a report on the strategy to endorse and obtain observer status for Taiwan in Interpol as well as other international organizations.

The U.S. House of Representatives, on the other hand, unanimously passed the bill in November last year.

Apart from the U.S. Congress, other key officials including Daniel Russel, assistant secretary of state for East Asian and Pacific Affairs, Susan Thornton, deputy assistant secretary of state for East Asian and Pacific Affairs and Kurt Tong, principal deputy assistant secretary for the Bureau of Economic and Business Affairs, all publicly expressed support for Taiwan’s participation in Interpol and other international organizations and institutions.

Taiwan was a full member of Interpol from 1964 until 1984, when China applied for membership.