Chen: Holding the R.O.C. flag is an act ‘worthy of pride’

The photo shows Chou Tzu-yu, 16, the only Taiwanese member of the South Korean pop group TWICE, holding a paper to read out her statement.

Chen: holding R.O.C. flag is an act 'worthy of pride'

The photo shows Chou Tzu-yu, 16, the only Taiwanese member of the South Korean pop group TWICE, holding a paper to read out her statement.

Democratic Progressive Party Chen Chien-jen voiced his support for a teenage star in South Korea, stating that to be Taiwanese is something “to be proud of”, reports said Saturday.

Chou Tzu-yu, 16, the only Taiwanese member of the South Korean pop group TWICE, was recently seen holding the Republic of China during a “My Little Show” on South Korean TV channel MBC.

The act was quickly slammed by Chinese netizens, accusing Chou for being a “pro-Taiwanese independence” activist.

According to media reports, China’s Huawei Technologies even demanded LG Uplus to drop Chou from endorsing its Y6 chain of cellphones in South Korea.

Chou previously endorsed the Y6 series of Huawei’s telephones, which has seen more than 20,000 sales in South Korea since its arrival last month, South Korean daily Chosun Ilbo reported Friday.

Chen, who was interviewed by local TV reporters in the morning at a polling station, said the controversy over the R.O.C. flag was regrettable.

“The uproar over such trivial matter is highly regrettable,” Chen said, adding that the forced apology made by Chou was “unnecessary.”

In the aftermath of China’s purported rhetoric, the teenage star released a video clip citing that: "There is only one China... I have always felt proud of being a Chinese."

Reading from a prepared text with her voice shaking, she said that she has "hurt the company and netizens' feelings due to my inappropriate words and actions during overseas promotions. I feel very, very sorry and guilty."

The clip has made headlines on the websites of Taiwan's media outlets and was widely shared on Facebook, the most popular social networking site in Taiwan, immediately after it was released.

However, since the row over her display of the R.O.C flag, support for her has been growing in Taiwan.