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Earth should not just belong to humans! A call for common concern to save endangered species

6 animals that need our protection. (Photo courtesy of Peter Yuan, Wildlife Alliance)

Luis Ko urges the public to save endangered species

6 animals that need our protection. (Photo courtesy of Peter Yuan, Wildlife Alliance)

I recently received a letter from the "Wildlife Alliance" which included a booklet about the “6 Animals That Need Your Protection Right Now.” Surprisingly, these cuddly animals are on their way to extinction and could soon disappear altogether, making my heart ache. After obtaining the relevant copyrights from the “Wildlife Alliance,” I feel like I have the responsibility to post those pictures of the pygmy slow loris, the smooth-coated otter, the Sunda pangolin, the yellow-cheeked gibbon, the dhole and the Asian elephant. I hope that even more young people stand up worldwide, because the Earth should not belong to humans alone. Luis Ko, I-Mei Foods CEO 6 animals that need our protection right now: Known in some parts of Asia as the animal that can cure 100 diseases, the slow loris has no proven medicinal benefits. The increasing demand for this animal has led to its steadfast decline, with a 30 percent loss over the past three decades. The slow loris is now endangered due to wildlife trafficking, habitat loss and use in medicine. Over 90 percent of trafficked animals die in transit because of contracting illness from having their teeth pulled out by poachers. (Photo courtesy of Peter Yuen, Wildlife Alliance) The smooth-coated otter is endangered due to habitat degradation caused by water pollution from pesticides and fertilizers. The population of this animal is rapidly decreasing in Cambodia. (Photo courtesy of Peter Yuen, Wildlife Alliance) The Sunda pangolin is a scaly mammal that rolls into a tiny ball when scared so that it becomes easily caught by poachers. The illegal trade in pangolins has been active over the past decade as in China and Vietnam, their meat is considered a delicacy and is sold for US$350 per kg; their scales, used in traditional medicine, fetch US$1,000 per kg. (Photo courtesy of Peter Yuen, Wildlife Alliance) The endangered yellow-cheeked crested gibbon can be found in the tall evergreen forests of Cambodia. The animal was hunted for the exotic pet trade, use in Chinese medicine, and for the illegal wild meat market. (Photo courtesy of Peter Yuen, Wildlife Alliance) With an estimated 2,500 animals left in the wild, this endangered species is on the brink of extinction due to habitat loss, illegal hunting, and disease transfer from domestic dogs. (Photo courtesy of Peter Yuen, Wildlife Alliance) It is estimated that only 35,000 Asian elephants remain. The population declined by at least 50 percent over the last 30 years due to increasing habitat destruction and sustained poaching. (Photo courtesy of Jeremy Holden, Wildlife Alliance)


Updated : 2021-06-17 02:28 GMT+08:00