Alexa
  • Directory of Taiwan

Economic burdens keep 45-and-older workers tied up in job market

Economic burdens keep 45-and-older workers tied up in job market

Taipei, Oct. 20 (CNA) Over 70 percent of Taiwan's senior workers have to work at least 40 hours a week, mainly because they still have economic burdens such as children's education, mortgages and other family expenditures, according to the results of a government survey released Tuesday. The Ministry of Labor's Institute of Labor, Occupational Safety and Health commissioned the survey of 1,075 Taiwanese workers 45 years of age or above between Jan. 19 and April 17 this year. The poll had a margin of error of plus or minus 2.99 percentage points. Of the 1,075 valid samples, males accounted for 57.5 percent, with those aged between 45 and 54 accounting for 63.2 percent. Nearly 90 percent of them had high school or higher education and 70.5 percent said they have to work because of economic burdens. The three top economic pressures are children's education costs (20.7 percent), mortgages (17.2 percent) and other household expenditures (14.5 percent), according to the survey results. The polled workers had an average 27.2 years of work experience; 46.6 percent of them said they have to work between 40 and 49 hours per week, with 23.9 percent clocking 50 hours or more of work per week. The full-time and part-time ratio of these workers was 9:1. Nearly half, or 46.4 percent, were employed by the private sector, 30.3 percent by the government, and 12.7 percent were self-employed. Some 45 percent earned less than NT$40,000 (US$1,235) per month. Nearly 20 percent of those surveyed said they have a fear of losing their jobs because their employers are downsizing or want to hire younger workers, or because their health is deteriorating. Over one-third, or 36.1 percent, said they would like to get a new job after retiring from their current ones. Analyzing the survey results, the institute said senior workers in Taiwan are facing such difficulties as family economic burdens, long work hours, unsatisfying pay, low job security and scant resources for job training. The institute urged the public and private sectors to build a senior-friendly employment environment and help workers quite advanced in age to gain new abilities for continued employment. The government and the private sector have a duty to create an environment that will allow retired workers who are interested in re-entering the job market to choose a flexible work schedule so that they can keep contributing to society, it added. (By Wei Yun-ling and S.C. Chang)


Updated : 2021-09-20 05:22 GMT+08:00