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Apple Daily: Tsai's participation in National Day celebrations

Apple Daily: Tsai's participation in National Day celebrations

Since opposition Democratic Progressive Party Chairwoman Tsai Ing-wen (???) announced her 2016 presidential bid, she has been very careful about her words and actions and has seldom made any mistakes. As a matter of fact, since her defeat in the 2012 presidential election, Tsai has been working hard to avoid mistakes. One of the things she has done right recently is to participate in the National Day ceremony, leading a group of DPP officials and party members. Why did she dare to do something that no other DPP chairperson has ever attempted? It was because she did not need to worry about attacks from her own party or other members of the green camp since the time is right, she has a strong chance of winning the presidential election, and her public popularity is high. Public distaste for the vicious struggle between the blue and green camps also created an opportunity for Tsai to do the right thing at the right time. Tsai's attendance at the National Day ceremony highlighted her self-confidence, wisdom and courage. It was also a show of her advocacy for a "grand reconciliation" and "grand unity." For Tsai, next year's presidential election is imbued with significance, which includes opportunities for deepening democracy, bridging divisions, healing wounds and creating consensus. Therefore, she chose to attend the blue camp's National Day ceremony to show her sincerity and identification with the Republic of China. In a democracy, differences are a matter of course, but a tolerant and inclusive approach is what makes a democracy great and sustainable. In 1986, then U.S. President Ronald Reagan spoke of his differences with his predecessor Jimmy Carter, in an address at the dedication ceremony for the Carter Presidential Center in Atlanta, Georgia. "None of us today need feel any urge, in the name of good will, to downplay our differences ... Today our very differences attest to the greatness of our nation," Reagan said. "For I can think of no other country on Earth where two political leaders could disagree so widely yet come together in mutual respect." Seeing Tsai standing next to Kuomintang Chairman Eric Chu (???) and People First Party Chairman James Soong (???) was a moment of pride for the Taiwanese people. If Reagan were still alive, he would have to change that line in his speech. (Editorial abstract -- Oct. 12, 2015) (By Y.F. Low)


Updated : 2021-09-24 19:31 GMT+08:00