Alexa
  • Directory of Taiwan

Taiwan colleges eying senior citizens as enrollments drop

Taiwan colleges eying senior citizens as enrollments drop

Taipei, Oct. 7 (CNA) Several colleges in Taiwan are adjusting their business models to admit older students as part of an effort to stay afloat financially in an environment of declining enrollments among traditional students. At a forum held Wednesday by the Ministry of Education to discuss transitions in higher education, one of the ideas put forward was to convert some educational facilities into health care centers and dormitories for older students. Chung Hwa University of Medical Technology in Tainan said it is planning to open special classes for senior citizens and work with medical establishments in the area to set up health and postpartum care centers. Hsuan Chuang University in Hsinchu also said it intends to establish a college specifically for senior citizens and will remodel some of its vacant dormitories for such students, as those facilities have been scantly occupied over the past few years due to declining enrollments. The participants at the forum cited the example of CTBC Financial Management College, a private institution that was reorganized and renamed earlier this year after it went bankrupt. With donations from CTBC Financial Holding, the college established three departments and a general education center and has admitted 150 students in the first semester, the participants said. Universities and colleges in Taiwan, particularly private ones in remote areas, have been struggling with falling enrollments. The Ministry of Education last year launched a higher education transition program, encouraging universities and colleges to find alternative uses for idle facilities and forcing those schools with extremely low enrollments to close. An assessment report by the ministry indicates that some of the 117 universities and colleges in Taiwan will suffer a severe decline in enrollment, starting in 2016. Nationwide, enrollments will drop 7 percent, from 271,000 in 2013 to 252,000 next year, the report said. It forecast a continued slide in the following years to 156,000 by 2028, about half the 2013 number. (By C.C. Chen and Lillian Lin)


Updated : 2021-09-24 09:09 GMT+08:00