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About Kuomintang candidate Hung Hsiu-chu

About Kuomintang candidate Hung Hsiu-chu

A statement by Hung Hsiu-chu: “Maybe, we didn’t perform well enough, we didn’t change fast enough, but if we only dare to do things, dare to reflect, I believe we can do it. Please, join hands with us, Change, and you will see!” Current position: deputy speaker of the Legislative Yuan Date of birth: April 7, 1948 Family Background: Hung Hsiu-chu originates from Yuyao County in Zhejiang Province, and is the second of four brothers and sisters. Her father, Hung Tzu-yu, arrived in Taiwan in early 1946 with the Kuomintang government and served in a deputy managing position at the Taiwan Sugar Corporation’s Yuemei Sugar Factory. During the White Terror era, he was implicated in a case and had to undergo three years of “re-education” on Green Island. After his release, he was unable to find another normal job, so the family became dependent on Hung Hsiu-chu’s mother for its income. Hung Hsiu-chu remembers that her father never mentioned the past with her mother, but that he only complained to her: “Have we not already been hurt enough by the KMT?” As he had been innocent, he hoped his daughter could study for lawyer or for judge, but she did not succeed in the examination for judge, but entered the world of education instead, which eventually led her to politics. Academic Career: Taipei City Dong Yuan Elementary School, Taipei Municipal Zhongshan Girls High School (previously known as the Taipei Second Girls’ High School), bachelor of law at the Chinese Culture Institute (now known as Chinese Culture University) Teaching Career 1970-1980: Just as Hung graduated from college in 1970, Taiwan introduced nine-year compulsory education. She began her ten-year career as an educator at the Xihu Vocational School. The following year, she moved to the Municipal Xiufeng High School in Xizhi, where at the age of 23 she became the nation’s youngest director of student affairs. Later, she served as director of student affairs and director of education affairs at the Banqiao Senior High School and head of counseling at the National Overseas Chinese Senior High School. Hung Hsiu-chu as a young director of student affairs. Political Career: After years as a teacher and education official, Hung went on to serve as head of the women’s department at the Taipei County KMT at the recommendation of KMT Taiwan provincial department chief Sung Shih-hsuan. When the party held its first primaries for election candidates in 1989, Hung ran without notable help and went on to be elected legislator in 1990. Since then, she has been elected eight terms, including three as at-large legislator. Legislative Career: As an educator, Hung spent many years as one of the conveners of the Legislative Yuan’s Education and Culture Committee, promoting legislation related to educational reform, school dropouts, teachers’ rights and national health insurance. On February 1, 2012, she was nominated as the KMT candidate for deputy speaker of the Legislative Yuan following two rounds of voting within the caucus. She won the election with 69 votes and became Taiwan’s first female deputy legislative speaker. On February 15 of the same year, she succeeded Tseng Yung-chuan as deputy chairperson of the KMT. Presidential Candidacy:/b> When Hung Hsiu-chu first emerged as a presidential contender, she said she wanted to force the major KMT heavyweights to present their candidacy, but in the end none of them did, leaving her as the only candidate in the primaries. She managed to break through all the barriers facing the primary contenders and was chosen by acclamation as the KMT presidential candidate at the party's July 19 congress. Hung says the phase of the 1992 Consensus has been completed, so Taiwan and China should move from “One China, Each His Own Interpretation” and “One China, No Interpretation” to “One China, The Same Interpretation,” with the concept “The Whole of China” strengthening the “One China” idea. Hung’s statements were labeled as being “extreme pro-unification,” reportedly causing supporters of the KMT’s native Taiwanese wing to drop the party. Hung later adapted her cross-straits policy to “1992 Consensus, 3 Contents,” meaning respecting the existence of the Republic of China, opposing Taiwan Independence and hoping the two sides can establish a stable and long-lasting peace agreement. The July 19 KMT Congress unanimously proclaimed Hung as the 2016 presidential candidate. The official campaign website


Updated : 2021-04-19 18:28 GMT+08:00