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U.S. will not accede to China's demands easily: scholar

U.S. will not accede to China's demands easily: scholar

Taipei, Sept. 23 (CNA) A senior U.S. official's remarks on cross-Taiwan Strait issues ahead of a meeting between leaders of the U.S. and China have shown that Washington will not work with the demands of China easily, a Taiwanese scholar said Tuesday. Chen Yi-hsin (???), a professor at Tamkang University, noted that U.S. National Security Adviser Susan Rice said earlier that day that the longstanding U.S. position remains unchanged. "We remain committed to our 'one China' policy based on the three joint communiques and the Taiwan Relations Act," Rice said. "Our fundamental interest is in peaceful and stable cross-strait relations, and we oppose unilateral changes to the status quo by either side," she added. According to Chen, Rice's remarks ahead of the Obama-Xi meeting mean that the U.S. will not work with the demands of China, including not forcing Tsai Ing-wen (???), presidential candidate of Taiwan's opposition Democratic Progressive Party (DPP), to accept the "1992 consensus." The "1992 consensus," as understood by the ruling Kuomintang, refers to a tacit agreement reached between Taiwan and China in 1992 that there is only one China, with each side free to interpret the meaning of the term. The DPP says the consensus does not, and has never, existed. Chen noted that the U.S. has reached a consensus with China previously that it will not interfere in the Taiwan Strait and will not interfere with the Jan. 16 presidential election next year. Chen said that the U.S. will continue to maintain the Taiwan Relations Act on cross-strait issues, as well as the six assurances made by the Reagan administration in 1982, which include not setting a date for ending U.S. arms sales to Taiwan and not pressuring Taiwan into negotiations with China. The U.S. will not work with China unless China makes big concessions, Chen assessed.
But Chen said he did not "see such signs right now." Chinese President Xi Jinping (???) arrived in Seattle Tuesday for his first state visit to the United States, during which the issue of Taiwan is expected to come up.
Xi will have a working dinner at the White House with Obama Sept. 24 and will be greeted with a 21-gun salute and hold a joint news conference with Obama a day later.
According to Rice, the two leaders will exchange views on human rights, cyber security and the South China Sea dispute. (By Ying Chun-chieh and Lilian Wu)


Updated : 2021-02-25 22:53 GMT+08:00