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NCHU develops tunable LSPR of 10nm Au Nanoparticles

NCHU develops tunable LSPR of 10nm Au Nanoparticles
NCHU Professor Lin Kuan-jiuh demonstrates his innovation at the MOST on Thursday.
MOST Minister Chien Chung-liang hosted NCHU's nanotechnology presentation on Thursday.

NCHU develops LSPR of 10nm Au Nanoparticles

NCHU Professor Lin Kuan-jiuh demonstrates his innovation at the MOST on Thursday.

MOST Minister Chien Chung-liang hosted NCHU's nanotechnology presentation on Thursday.

Nanotechnology, the manipulation of matter at the atomic and molecular scale to create materials with remarkably varied and new properties, is a rapidly expanding area of research with huge potential in many sectors, ranging from healthcare to construction and electronics. In medicine, it promises to revolutionize gene therapy, diagnostics, and many areas of developments and clinical applications.

In collaboration with the Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST), the Department of Supramolecular Materials/Nano Materials at National Chung Hsing University (NCHU) unveiled on Wednesday its latest achievements in the fabrication of tunable surface plasmon resonance of 10nm Au Nanoparticles, or Au-LSPR.

Under the theory of plasmonic coupling effect, NCHU Professor Lin Kuan-jiuh was able to use microwave plasma heating technology to develop tunable LSPR of Au NPs with accurate control of film thickness, thus allowing for many practical applications such as biosensor, chemo-sensor, surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS).

“During clinical trials, our revolutionary method has been able to shorten the analysis of protein synuclein to three hours, whereas through ELISA it takes no less than 13 hours for the same result,” Lin said.

The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is a test that uses antibodies and color change to identify a substance.

“Professor Lin’s discovery will aid in the eventual phase-out of ELISA in the coming future,” MOST Minister Chien Chung-liang said.

Developed with portability, disposability, and simplicity in mind, the Au-LSPR will be able to be used to analyze Parkinson’s Disease at a faster rate than conventional laboratory tests.

“Au-LSPR is a tried-and-true method waiting to be mass adopted in clinical applications,” he said.

With over 20 international patents, the fabrication of Au-LSPR has yet to be commercialized, as the professor is willing to transfer the technological know-how and expertise to medical equipment suppliers worldwide.


Updated : 2021-09-29 02:50 GMT+08:00