Alexa
  • Directory of Taiwan

President casts doubt over DPP presidential hopeful's China policy

President casts doubt over DPP presidential hopeful's China policy

Taipei, Aug. 25 (CNA) President Ma Ying-jeou cast doubt Tuesday over the China policy of Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) presidential candidate Tsai Ing-wen and expressed concerns over the future development of cross-Taiwan Strait ties.
Tsai, who is leading in the polls, has stated that if elected, she will "maintain the status quo" across the Taiwan Strait, Ma said during his opening remarks at the Taiwan-U.S.-Japan Trilateral Security Dialogue on Tuesday in Taipei.
"But no one knows whether the 'status quo' she is talking about is the status quo of peace and stability that we've created and experienced for the past seven years," he said.
"Or is she talking about the status quo that preceded my administration, in which there was no cross-strait foundation of mutual trust, and the 'status quo' consisted of Taiwan perceived by the international community as a 'troublemaker?'" he said.
Tensions across the strait have eased significantly since Ma took office in May 2008.
He said he hopes Tsai's status quo means the peace and stability across the strait.
Tsai, also the chairwoman of the opposition DPP and a heavy favorite to win the presidency in 2016, has said she would promote cross-strait relations under the current Republic of China Constitution if she gains office.
"If elected president, I will push for the peaceful and stable development of cross-strait relations in accordance with the will of the Taiwanese people and the existing ROC constitutional order," Tsai said during a speech at a think tank in Washington in June. At Tuesday's event, Ma also touched on the improvements in cross-strait ties and Taiwan's relations with Japan and the United States over the past few years.
Meanwhile, noting the tensions in the South China Sea over competing territorial claims, Ma brought up his South China Sea Peace Initiative, which calls for the parties concerned to shelve disputes and seek joint development of resources.
The proposal calls for the parties concerned to exercise self-restraint and refrain from taking any unilateral action that might escalate tensions and jointly uphold the freedom and safety of navigation and flight across the South China Sea.
"We also hope that all parties concerned are included in the mechanisms or measures that enhance peace and prosperity in the South China Sea," Ma said.
The dialogue has brought together lawmakers from Taiwan and the United States, as well as local and foreign experts and scholars from Japan, Australia, India, Indonesia, South Korea, New Zealand, Singapore, Vietnam, the Philippines and the U.S.
The one-day event was co-organized by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the Chinese Council of Advanced Policy Studies in Taipei, the Washington-based Heritage Foundation, and the Japan Institute of International Affairs.
Former U.S. Deputy Secretary of State James B. Steinberg is scheduled to give a keynote speech titled "Shared Trilateral (U.S.-Taiwan-Japan) Security Interests in East Asia." (By Elaine Hou)


Updated : 2021-09-23 08:59 GMT+08:00